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Scottish Budget Draft Budget 2014-15

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Chapter 6 Justice

Portfolio Responsibilities

The Justice portfolio has responsibility for the civil and criminal justice systems which include Scotland's prisons, courts, police, fire and rescue services, the legal aid system and criminal justice social work services. The portfolio also supports work to build Scotland's resilience through multi-agency planning.

The purpose of the Justice portfolio is to keep our communities safe, and to administer justice in its various forms: civil, criminal and administrative.

In delivering our Purpose we aim to contribute positively to a flourishing Scotland, helping to create an inclusive and respectful society in which all people and communities live in safety and security; where individual and collective rights are supported and, where disputes are resolved fairly and swiftly.

Supporting Recovery And Increasing Sustainable Economic Growth

The justice system is a vital public service and one in which powers are largely devolved to the Scottish Parliament. Working closely with partners, the Justice portfolio has demonstrated how much can be achieved when decisions about Scotland are taken within Scotland by people committed to delivering the best outcomes for our communities.

The justice system has played a crucial role in supporting the Scottish Government's overall Purpose for ensuring sustainable economic growth and promoting employment and employability. It has delivered radical reforms to Scotland's justice services, for example, by reforming the police and fire services and helping to protect frontline services from the impact of financial cuts. Despite UK Government spending reductions, police officer numbers in Scotland have been maintained at more than 1,000 higher than in 2007.

Radical reform of public services has focused attention on preventative approaches to tackle the root causes of crime and help communities and individuals to achieve their potential. Scottish Ministers have driven the creation of a single national police service, not only to harmonise and focus resources, but to reconnect with local communities and radically re-shape how social issues are tackled across Scotland, in partnership with a wide range of public and third sector organisations. We have maintained access to justice for individuals and businesses through the Legal Aid system and are also investing in advice services to help people deal with the impact of the UK Government's radical welfare reforms.

National Outcomes

The Justice portfolio has specific goals which are designed to make a real difference to both our society and our economy. To achieve these goals, we focus our efforts on three National Outcomes, which guide our work within the justice system. These are:

  • we live our lives safe from crime, disorder and danger;
  • we have strong, resilient and supportive communities where people take responsibility for their own actions and how they affect others; and
  • our public services are high quality, continually improving, efficient and responsive to local people's needs.

These three National Outcomes have been broken down to a set of eight justice outcomes which describe the Scotland we want to create and sustain. They are:

  • we experience low levels of crime;
  • we experience low levels of fear, alarm and distress;
  • we are at a low risk of unintentional harm;
  • our people and communities support and respect each other, exercising both their rights and responsibilities;
  • we have high levels of public confidence in justice institutions and processes;
  • our public services are fair and accessible;
  • our institutions and processes are effective and efficient; and
  • our public services respect the rights and voices of users.

Based firmly on evidence, we believe that by focusing our activity and resources on delivering these outcomes is the best way to make a tangible difference to the lives of the people of Scotland.

The commitment of justice agencies to work together to deliver these outcomes is set out within the Strategy for Justice in Scotland (2012). No one part of the justice system can deliver these outcomes alone. No single project or initiative can be implemented in one part of the system without having implications for other parts of the system. We therefore work in partnership with all organisations across criminal, civil and administrative justice, and beyond, with organisations in education, health and housing. Our collaboration spans the public, private and third sectors. It is based on all partners having a shared vision and taking collective responsibility to deliver improved outcomes.

Budget Changes

An additional £63.4 million of non-cash Resource DEL has been allocated to the Scottish Police Authority (SPA) and Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) to cover depreciation charges related to assets transferred from legacy Police and Fire Bodies and new assets purchased during the year. This additional non-cash budget cover was provided directly by HM Treasury and reflects the classification of the Scottish Police Authority and Scottish Fire and Rescue Service as central government bodies (from 1 April 2013). The additional non-cash budget is spending power neutral.

An additional £15 million in 2014-15 and 2015-16 for police and fire pensions.

There are also a number of smaller budget changes that are detailed in the relevant budget sections.

Our Priorities

In 2014-15 and 2015-16 we will prioritise spending in the following ways:

  • we will deliver the savings from the successful transition to the new single police service while maintaining a strong police presence in our communities with our commitment to 1,000 more police officers than were in post when we took office in 2007, maintaining a strong and visible police presence which is helping to keep our communities safer;
  • we will work through our Building Safer Communities programme to reduce crime, particularly violent crime. We will work jointly with partners to deter high risk and vulnerable groups from committing crime at an early stage, working with children and families as a priority. Along with tough enforcement initiatives from Police Scotland, we will continue to support approaches which focus on early intervention, prevention and changing offending behaviour. This includes investment in violence reduction and knife crime educational programmes, in addition to innovative partnership approaches to reduce violence. We will continue to support work to protect society from sex offenders and action to tackle domestic abuse and violence against women;
  • we will work to reduce the damaging impacts of alcohol and drug problems. We will continue to support an approach based on tackling those criminals who supply drugs alongside our investment of £32.3 million to support people, families and communities into recovery from problem drug use;
  • we will continue to work to prevent offending by young people. We have ensured that the proceeds of crime are reinvested in our communities through our CashBack for Communities programme, enabling young people to take part in sporting, cultural, educational and mentoring activities. Since 2008, we have invested and committed over £50 million across Scotland and funded 1.1 million activities and opportunities for young people;
  • we will work to reduce reoffending. We will continue to support tough and effective community sentencing through the Community Payback Order. We will focus on early and targeted intervention to reduce reoffending and we will look to improve links between employment, housing, education and health services to help people who have repeatedly offended access the services they need to reduce their reoffending. The Reducing Reoffending Change Fund will support services to provide offenders with substantial one-to-one support through evidence-based mentoring schemes which will be delivered by Public Social Partnerships (PSPs). The existing evidence base suggests that mentoring is a promising intervention with the potential to help offenders build new social networks that can support the desistance process; increase offenders' chances of employability; and support offenders' engagement with other interventions that can work to reduce reoffending (for example through signposting, increasing motivation and increasing attendance);
  • the evidence shows us that these outcomes are associated with reductions in reoffending in the longer term. Reducing reconviction rates and frequencies to a level which maintains or lowers the prison population will ensure that we avoid the significant costs of expanding the prison estate in future;
  • we will work to ensure that victims and witnesses have positive experiences of, and confidence in, the justice system;
  • we will work to reduce the harm from fires and other emergencies and will support the continuing work of Scotland's single fire and rescue service, protecting frontline services and enhancing effectiveness. We will continue to invest in local and national multi-agency shared service initiatives to ensure appropriate responses to emergencies;
  • we will work to tackle hate crime and sectarianism. We will invest over £3 million to support community-based initiatives to tackle sectarianism and further develop our understanding through research, while continuing to support work to tackle racial or ethnic hatred. We will also maintain work to support victims in their engagement with Justice agencies;
  • we will continue our work to transform civil and administrative justice, reforming the courts and tribunal systems to make them more cost effective, efficient and accessible;
  • we will continue to enable access to justice while advancing law reform. We will ensure that those most in need are able to access publicly-funded legal assistance and progress a range of projects under the Making Justice Work Programme to enable access to justice. We will work to ensure that disputes are resolved at the most appropriate level in the justice system and will progress work to reform criminal and civil procedure to keep pace with changes in society and international standards;
  • we will continue to work on improving processes in the courts system and we will progress work to develop further our unified Scottish Tribunals Service; and
  • we will work to enhance efficiency, ensuring that the benefits of police and fire service reform are realised. These programmes of reform will deliver recurring cashable savings from 2016-17 in excess of £130 million, ensuring that frontline services are protected at a time of financial constraint.

Table 6.01: Spending Plans (Level 2)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Community Justice Services 31.9 32.3 32.3
Courts, Judiciary and Scottish Tribunals Service 51.7 51.6 51.6
Criminal Injuries Compensation 20.5 17.5 17.5
Legal Aid 149.3 142.8 146.4
Scottish Police Authority (SPA)1 1,086.4 1,082.6 1,073.0
Scottish Fire and Rescue Service 293.1 310.2 309.2
Police Central Government 114.0 101.3 101.3
Safer and Stronger Communities [Drugs and Community Safety] 38.7 40.3 40.3
Police and Fire Pensions 291.8 324.7 346.8
Scottish Prison Service 364.5 382.3 398.2
Miscellaneous 30.1 31.2 25.3
Scottish Court Service 80.2 72.3 73.4
Total Level 2 2,552.2 2,589.1 2,615.3
of which:
DEL Resource 2,465.6 2,543.0 2,524.3
DEL Capital 86.6 46.1 91.0
AME - - -
Central Government Grants to Local Authorities 86.5 86.5 86.5

1. The 2013-14 budget figures exclude depreciation relating to assets transferred from legacy Police and Fire Boards and assets purchased in-year. For comparative purposes the budget is £60.5 million.

Table 6:02: Spending Plans (Level 2 real terms) at 2013-14 prices

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Community Justice Services 31.9 31.7 31.1
Courts, Judiciary and Scottish Tribunals Service 51.7 50.6 49.7
Criminal Injuries Compensation 20.5 17.2 16.9
Legal Aid 149.3 140.1 141.1
Scottish Police Authority (SPA) 1,086.4 1,062.4 1,034.4
Scottish Fire and Rescue Service 293.1 304.4 298.1
Police Central Government 114.0 99.4 97.7
Safer and Stronger Communities [Drugs and Community Safety] 38.7 39.5 38.8
Police and Fire Pensions 291.8 318.6 334.3
Scottish Prison Service 364.5 375.2 383.9
Miscellaneous 30.1 30.6 24.4
Scottish Court Service 80.2 71.0 70.8
Total Level 2 2,552.2 2,540.7 2,521.2
of which:
DEL Resource 2,465.6 2,495.5 2,433.5
DEL Capital 86.6 45.2 87.7
AME - - -
Central Government Grants to Local Authorities 86.5 84.9 83.4

Community Justice Services

Table 6.03: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Offender services 25.3 25.8 25.8
Victim/witness support 5.7 5.6 5.6
Miscellaneous 0.9 0.9 0.9
Total 31.9 32.3 32.3
of which:
DEL Resource 31.9 32.3 32.3
DEL Capital - - -
AME - - -

What the budget does

This programme provides funding for: Community Justice Authorities/Local Authorities by supporting their expenditure in the delivery of criminal justice social work services including the costs of Community Payback Orders; the electronic monitoring of offenders (e.g. through Restriction of Liberty Orders) across Scotland; providing support to local authorities for their role in Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) in relation to sex offenders and restricted patients; it covers the running costs of Community Justice Authorities, and it also provides section 10 funding to voluntary organisations operating in the criminal justice social work sector. These resources are in addition to resources for the support of community justice services provided by local authorities.

This budget also provides core funding for third sector organisations whose work supports the victims of crime.

In 2014-15 and 2015-16 we will:

  • continue to fund victim support organisations to enable them to meet the needs of victims of crime;
  • develop and support initiatives to address the cycle of repeat offending through the projects of our Reducing Reoffending Programme, Phase 2;
  • in order to show our support for robust community disposals, we will maintain the budgets for Community Payback Orders;
  • develop the electronic monitoring service in Scotland, following consultation to determine the future direction of electronic monitoring and satellite tracking; and
  • continue to implement the recommendations of the Commission on Women Offenders to support the female prison population.

Courts, Judiciary and Scottish Tribunal Service

Table 6.04: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Courts, Judiciary 10.3 10.0 10.0
Scottish Tribunal Service 11.5 11.0 11.0
Judicial Salaries* 29.9 30.6 30.6
Total 51.7 51.6 51.6
of which:
DEL Resource 51.7 51.6 51.6
DEL Capital - - -
AME - - -

*This is non-voted spend which is met from the Scottish Consolidated Fund but is also part of the Departmental spending limit.

What the budget does

The funding for courts and the judiciary element of this budget provides for the Scottish Government contribution to the superannuation costs of judicial office holders in Scotland, and for the running costs of a number of justice agencies, such as the Judicial Appointments Board for Scotland. A separate budget is allocated from the Scottish Consolidated Fund to meet the salary costs of judicial office holders in Scotland.

The Scottish Tribunals Service (STS) provides support to a range of tribunals operating in Scotland and is delivering the reform of the Scottish tribunal system.

In 2014-15 and 2015-16 we will:

  • continue to build a more efficient and effective service to Scottish tribunals supported by the STS and further develop the work of tribunals through the proposed Tribunals (Scotland) Bill and - if agreed - the proposed merger with the Scottish Court Service in 2015; and
  • focus our resources on ensuring an independent and effective judiciary and timely and appropriate judicial appointments.

Criminal Injuries Compensation

Table 6.05: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Administration Costs 2.7 2.7 2.7
CIC Scheme 17.8 14.8 14.8
Total 20.5 17.5 17.5
of which:
DEL Resource 20.5 17.5 17.5
DEL Capital - - -
AME - - -

What the budget does

The Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme meets the cost of compensation payments to the blameless victims of crime and is administered by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority.

In 2014-15 and 2015-16 we will:

  • continue to meet the cost of compensation payments to the blameless victims of crime in Scotland, and fund a share of the running costs of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority in line with the Memorandum of Understanding; and
  • consider options to review the current GB-wide Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme to ensure compensation arrangements relevant to the needs of victims in Scotland.

Legal Aid

Table 6.06: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Administration 11.2 10.7 10.3
Fund 138.1 132.1 136.1
Total 149.3 142.8 146.4
of which:
DEL Resource 149.2 142.3 146.3
DEL Capital 0.1 0.5 0.1
AME - - -

What the budget does

The Scottish Legal Aid Board (a Non-Departmental Public Body that derives its general powers and functions from the Legal Aid (Scotland) Act 1986) administers the provision of the publicly funded legal assistance provided under this budget in Scotland and has responsibility for the settlement of all legal aid accounts. In addition, the Board funds a range of advice services, including ensuring that people in Scotland get the help and advice they need to deal with problems such as multiple debts, repossession and eviction. The Board also employs solicitors under Part V of the 1986 Act to provide a service that complements existing advice provision and helps address unmet legal need in relation to matters dealt with under civil legal assistance. Finally, the Board delivers criminal legal advice and representation to accused persons through its funding of the Public Defence Solicitors Office network.

Budget changes

An additional £0.4 million has been allocated for essential refurbishment work on the Legal Aid Board offices in 2014-15. An additional £3.6 million has been allocated in 2015-16 towards an anticipated increase in Legal Aid costs.

In 2014-15 and 2015-16 we will:

  • direct resources to maintain access to justice, focusing on those most in need and ensuring that legal aid expenditure supports the efficient operation of the wider justice system;
  • work with the Scottish Legal Aid Board and legal profession to further develop proposals for contracting for criminal legal aid services; and
  • continue investment to enable people to access necessary help and advice services.

Scottish Police Authority

Table 6.07: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Scottish Police Authority 1,086.4 1,082.6 1,073.0
Total
of which: 1,068.1 1,057.4 1,044.4
DEL Resource 18.3 25.2 28.6
DEL Capital - - -
AME - - -

What the budget does

This budget is provided to the SPA which, in turn, allocates resources to the Chief Constable of the Police Service of Scotland. Through a joint planning and budgeting process, the expenditure delivers an effective and efficient policing service to the people in Scotland across our communities.

Budget changes

An additional £41.4 million in non-cash Resource DEL has been allocated to SPA in 2014-15 and £50 million in 2015-16 to cover depreciation on assets. This additional non-cash budget cover was provided directly by HM Treasury and is spending power neutral. The 2013-14 budget figure does not include the equivalent amount. For comparative purposes the figure is £39.1 million.

In 2014-15 and 2015-16 we will:

  • continue to support and work with the Scottish Police Authority and the Police Service of Scotland, in line with the published Strategic Police Plan, to ensure that the benefits of police reform are delivered at national level and for local communities.

This includes providing support for:

  • the statutory policing principles and functions set out in the Police and Fire Reform (Scotland) Act 2012;
  • police officer numbers to remain at more than 1,000 higher than in 2007;
  • police services, including training forensics services, ICT and criminal records; and
  • tackling serious and organised crime, drug enforcement and counter terrorism.

The capital budgets for 2014-15 and 2015-16 will support the police in delivering key components of their three-year capital plan, including the i-6 system and investment in ICT infrastructure.

Scottish Fire and Rescue Service

Table 6.08: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-14 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Operating Expenditure 277.8 310.2 283.9
Capital Expenditure 15.3 - 25.3
Total 293.1 310.2 309.2
of which:
DEL Resource 277.8 310.2 283.9
DEL Capital 15.3 - 25.3
AME - - -

What the budget does

This budget funds the SFRS to work in partnership with other agencies, the public and private sector and communities on fire safety, prevention, protection and emergency response, to improve the safety and wellbeing of the people of Scotland. Details of the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service priorities will be in its Strategic and Annual Plans, which align with the Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2013.

Budget changes

An additional £22 million in non-cash Resource DEL has been allocated to SFRS in 2014-15 and £24.7 million in 2015-16 to cover depreciation on assets. This additional non-cash budget cover was provided directly by HM Treasury and is spending power neutral. The 2013-14 budget figure does not include the equivalent amount. For comparative purposes the figure is £21.4 million.

In 2014-15 and 2015-16 we will:

  • continue to work with the SFRS to ensure that those priorities are achieved whilst the full benefits of the establishment of a single national service are delivered.

Police Central Government

Table 6.09: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Police Support Services 21.2 2.8 2.8
National Police Funding and Reform 92.8 98.5 98.5
Total 114.0 101.3 101.3
of which:
DEL Resource 96.1 101.3 101.3
DEL Capital 17.9 - -
AME - - -

What the budget does

General spending by the police is met through the funding for the Scottish Police Authority. Funding remaining in the Police Central Government (PCG) budget in 2014-15 and 2015-16 includes funding for the Police Investigation Review Commissioner (PIRC), and the Airwave communication system. £70 million in 2014-15 and £70 million in 2015-16 is available to support police reform.

Budget changes

For 2014-15 £2.8 million is allocated to cover depreciation costs of the Scottish Crime Campus at Gartcosh. The 2013-14 allocation of £21.1 million had included £18.3 million for the construction of the campus which is on track to be completed in October 2013.

Resource budget of £0.2 million has been transferred out of the Police Central Government budget from 2014-15 into the Safer and Stronger Communities budget to cover expenditure on projects including support for multi-agency public protection arrangements, sex offender notifications and the UK central authority for the exchange of criminal records.

Resource budget of £4.2 million has been transferred out of the Police Central Government budget from 2014-15 and into the Transport Scotland budget to cover expenditure on road safety cameras.

Resource budget of £0.4 million has been transferred out of the Police Central Government budget into the Local Government budget to cover residual national police costs borne by local authorities.

In 2014-15 and 2015-16 we will:

  • support the Police Investigation and Review Commissioner (PIRC);
  • invest in police reform to deliver savings in this and future years; and
  • continue to fund the core Airwave communications system for police in Scotland.

Drugs and Community Safety

Table 6.10: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Community Safety 6.4 8.0 8.0
Drug Misuse 32.3 32.3 32.3
Total 38.7 40.3 40.3
of which:
DEL Resource 38.7 40.3 40.3
DEL Capital - - -
AME - - -

What the budget does

The bulk of this budget is allocated to the Alcohol and Drug Partnerships via NHS Boards into services to promote recovery from problem drug use. This budget also supports the strategic operation of Alcohol and Drug Partnerships along with a range of initiatives to build safer communities and tackle sectarianism, drug problems, misuse of guns and other crime.

Budget changes

£0.4 million has been provided for the Building Safer Communities Justice change programme aimed at improving community safety and reducing violence.

Resource budget of £0.2 million has been transferred from the Police Central Government budget, from 2014-15, into the Safer and Stronger Communities budget to cover expenditure on projects including support for sex offender notifications and the UK central authority for the exchange of criminal records.

At Budget Revision stage, the Safer and Stronger Communities budget will be increased to include funds recovered under the Proceeds of Crime Act. Ministers will use this to invest in positive opportunities for young people helping to divert them from crime and antisocial behaviour.

In 2014-15 and 2015-16 we will:

  • work towards creating a sectarian-free Scotland which is inclusive, fair and celebrates the positive identity of our many diverse communities. This includes a strong focus on funding activity at community level;
  • work to reduce problem drug use by supporting people, families and communities to recover and to sustain recovery across Scotland;
  • work to reduce crime, fear of crime, violence and antisocial behaviour by tackling its root causes, funding violence reduction educational programmes, anti-violence initiatives, promoting positive behaviour and building strong and resilient communities; and
  • continue to develop and grow the CashBack for Communities programme to provide positive opportunities for our young people.

Police and Fire Pensions

Table 6.11: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Police Pensions 231.0 262.5 275.6
Fire Pensions 60.8 62.2 71.2
Total 291.8 324.7 346.8
of which:
DEL Resource 291.8 324.7 346.8
DEL Capital - - -
AME - - -

What the budget does

This budget provides funding to SPA and SFRS to contribute towards the pension costs of retired police and fire officers.

We will meet our obligations to provide for these pensions in full. Given the lack of clarity over the details of UK Government-driven reforms to public sector pensions, the numbers published above are based on historic trends. They will be updated in due course once the position becomes clearer.

Scottish Prison Service

Table 6.12: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Current Expenditure 342.0 368.9 368.2
Capital Spending 22.5 13.4 30.0
Total 364.5 382.3 398.2
of which:
DEL Resource 342.0 368.9 368.2
DEL Capital 22.5 13.4 30.0
AME - - -

What the budget does

The Scottish Prison Service (SPS) budget covers expenditure associated with operating the prison system (both publicly and privately managed prisons) and the provision of a Court Custody and Prisoner Escorting Service (CCPES) on behalf of Scottish Courts, Scottish police and the wider justice system. The SPS provides a wide range of services to care for and support those who are in custody and their families and it also operates a Victim Notification Scheme for registered victims of crime.

In 2014-15 and 2015-16 SPS will focus its resources on:

  • starting to operate HMP Grampian as the new prison for offenders residing in the Northern Community Justice Authority catchment area - and completing the closure and disposal of HMPs Aberdeen and Peterhead;
  • implementing the programme of change resulting from the SPS Organisational Review;
  • working with partner organisations to reduce the risk of prisoners reoffending on release from custody;
  • taking forward work to plan the replacement of HMPs Barlinnie and Inverness; and
  • implementing key recommendations from the Commission on Women Offenders, including ensuring suitable fit for purpose prison accommodation tailored for the needs of female prisoners. We recognise the need for the Scottish Prison Service to phase the necessary investment in the prison estate within the resources available to it. We commit over this Spending Review period and the next to make the necessary resources available to SPS to implement the modernisation of the prison estate for female prisoners, including a new dedicated facility at HMP Inverclyde.

Miscellaneous

Table 6.13: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Residential accommodation for children 5.5 5.5 5.5
Scottish Resilience 13.9 14.4 8.4
Other miscellaneous 10.7 11.3 11.4
Total 30.1 31.2 25.3
of which:
DEL Resource 30.1 31.2 25.3
DEL Capital - - -
AME - - -

What the budget does

This budget covers a wide range of smaller justice related spending areas such as residential accommodation for children, the Scottish Law Commission, the Parole Board for Scotland, the Risk Management Authority, the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission and provision for Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Prisons in Scotland, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Fire and Rescue in Scotland and Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary in Scotland.

In addition, the budget supports work to build Scotland's resilience through improved multi-agency planning and response to emergencies. This budget also provides funding to support the delivery of the Scottish Government's commitment to the armed forces and veterans community in Scotland while policy responsibility for this area lies within the Infrastructure Investment and Cities portfolio.

Budget changes

From 2014-15 this budget now includes the remainder of the previous separate 'Scottish Resilience' Level 2, shown as a separate Level 3 in the above table. Following the establishment of the single SFRS and the transfer of previously centrally funded fire services such as the Fire College and Firelink to the new body, the remaining budgets were no longer of a scale to justify a separate Level 2.

In 2014-15 and 2015-16 we will:

  • support effective government and multi-agency response to emergencies through the operation of SGoRR (the Scottish Government Resilience room); and
  • support the delivery of the Scottish Government's commitment to the armed forces and veterans community in Scotland.

Scottish Court Service

Table 6.14: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Operating Expenditure 67.7 65.3 66.4
Capital 12.5 7.0 7.0
Total 80.2 72.3 73.4
of which:
DEL Resource 67.7 65.3 66.4
DEL Capital 12.5 7.0 7.0
AME - - -

What the budget does

The Scottish Court Service (SCS) provides the people, buildings and technology to support the work of Scotland's courts, the judiciary of those courts and the Office of the Public Guardian. The SCS is a non-ministerial department led by a governing Board, chaired by the Lord President and with a majority of judicial members.

Budget changes

Figures for 2014-15 and 2015-16 have been adjusted to take account of depreciation charges arising from additional funding for capital to support estate spend on backlog maintenance and other improvements arising from legal compliance and sustainability, and for enhancements to information technology infrastructure and business systems required by significant legal reforms.

In 2014-15 and 2015-16, we will work with the judicially-led SCS on:

  • taking forward reforms to the structure and processes of the court through the cross-justice Making Justice Work programme, including reducing inefficiency in the use of court time, enacting court closures and ensuring a court estate that is cost effective, proportionate, sustainable and accessible;
  • transforming civil justice in Scotland by ensuring that cases are heard by the right court, by developing a simplified body of court rules that are fully supported by digital technology and by supporting the Scottish Civil Justice Council in driving continuous improvement;
  • delivering key reforms, along with other justice bodies, to the criminal justice system, in particular arising from Lord Carloway's review of criminal justice, Sheriff Principal Bowen's review of sheriff and jury procedures and the Victims and Witnesses Bill;
  • investing in the IT platform to increase our use of digital technology and video links to improve access to justice and maximise system efficiency; and
  • preparing for the potential merger between SCS and Scottish Tribunal Service.

Central Government Grants to Local Authorities

Table 6.15: More Detailed Spending Plans (Level 3)

2013-14 Budget
£m
2014-15 Draft Budget
£m
2015-16 Plans
£m
Criminal Justice Social Work 86.5 86.5 86.5
Total 86.5 86.5 86.5
of which:
DEL Resource 86.5 86.5 86.5
DEL Capital - - -
AME - - -

What the budget does

Following the Concordat agreement between the Scottish Government and local authorities, most of the previous budget for ring-fenced grant was added to the budget for general support to local authorities. This table shows the remaining area, Criminal Justice Social Work (CJSW), that is a ring-fenced grant to local authorities (or similar bodies) for justice purposes.

This funding supports local authorities in providing CJSW services across Scotland. These services include supervising those offenders aged 16 and over who have been subject to a community disposal from the courts; providing reports to courts to assist with sentencing decisions; and providing statutory supervision (throughcare) for certain offenders on release from prison. There are also special services for certain key groups of offenders.