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Supplementary Web Tables 2010

The tables are available here

These statistics were published on 27 September 2011.

SUMMARY

GP Consultations and Hospital Utilisation

18% of adults had consulted their GP in the last 2 weeks with men less likely to do so than women (14% versus 22%). For women, there was little variation by age, however, older men were more likely to have consulted their GP recently than younger men. These patterns have remained broadly consistent over time. Women have more GP consultations per year than men (7.3 versus 4.5) The mean number of GP consultations per year remained fairly constant for women of all ages, ranging from 6 to 8, whereas men aged 55 and over consulted their GP more often than younger men. Tables W1 and W3

Both men and women were more likely to have attended hospital as an outpatient during the last 12 months (35% and 41% respectively) than as an inpatient (10% and 13%). For men, the likelihood of attending hospital generally increased with age for both outpatients and inpatients. For women age was less of a factor for inpatients, possibly due to younger women attending hospital to give birth. Table W2

Carers

Women were more likely than men to provide regular help or care for any sick, disabled or frail person inside or outside their home (14% and 10% respectively), with these levels remaining similar to those observed in 2008 and 2009. The proportion providing regular care increases with age up to age 64, then decreases. Table W4

Carers aged 16-44 were less likely to report very good or good self-assessed health than non-carers (75% of male and 68% of female carers compared to 86% of male and 85% of female non-carers aged 16-44). The same pattern was seen for males aged 45-64 but there was little difference in the self-assessed health of females in this age group. For both men and women the pattern was reversed in the over 65 age group with carers reporting better self-assessed health than non-carers (67 % of male and 65% of female carers reported very good / good health compared to 59% of male and 61% of female non-carers). Table W5

Carers aged 16-44 had lower mental wellbeing than those who were not carers, with a much larger effect for women than men (female carers scored 2.5 points lower on the WEMWBS scale than female non-carers). The same was true for male carers aged 45-64 with a gap of 1.0 points. The pattern was reversed for male carers aged 65 and over with carers scoring 2.4 points higher. There was little difference in mental wellbeing of female carers and non-carers above the age of 45. Table W6

Alcohol

36% of men and 31% of women reported that they were most likely to drink once or twice a week. The proportion of men who drank on 3 or more days a week was greater for those aged 55 and over compared with younger age groups (ranging from 38% to 41% compared with 15% to 28% for those under 55). The pattern for women was fairly similar although less strong (ranging from 15% to 22% for those aged 35 and over compared with 6%-10% for those under 35. Almost twice as many men as women drank on 5 or more days a week (13% and 7% respectively) with the proportions increasing with age (26%-27% of men aged 65 and over and ranging from 10% to 14% of women aged 55 and over). Conversely, participants in the oldest age group (aged 75 and over) were also the most likely not to drink at all (21% of men and 38% of women). Table W7

Men were more likely to drink normal strength beer, lager, stout, cider or shandy with 8.0 units on average per week whereas women were most likely to drink wine with 4.0 units on average consumed per week. Spirits were more likely to be drunk by younger women with the highest consumption among 16-24 year olds and consumption generally decreasing with age. The pattern for men was less clear with the highest consumption of spirits among the over 55s followed by the 16-24 year old group. The highest consumers of wine were women aged between 34 and 54 and men aged between 45 and 74. Table W8

Physical Activity at Work

Twice as many women as men indicated that their job mainly involved sitting down (33% versus 16%). When asked about physical activities involved in their job (i.e. whether their work involved moving between floors, climbing (ladders, scaffolding etc), lifting heavy loads or carrying heavy objects), almost four in ten men (39%) and more than half of women (52%) reported their work involved none of these activities. There was no clear pattern with age although it should be noted that the sample sizes for individual age groups are relatively small and therefore care should be taken when comparing and interpreting results. Table W9

Sedentary behaviour

Men were likely to spend more time sitting at a screen (i.e. including television viewing or using a computer or games console other than at work, school or college) on an average day than women. This applied to both weekdays (3.8 vs 3.3 hours per day on average) and weekend days (4.0 vs 3.4 hours per day on average). Both men and women spent more time sitting at a screen on weekend days than week days although the difference was very small. Over half (51%) of men spent more than 4 hours per day sitting at a screen on weekend days compared with 42% of women. Those aged 16-24 and 55 and over were likely to spend more time sitting at a screen on weekdays than those aged 25 to 54. It should be noted that the sample sizes for each age group in this table are relatively small and therefore care should be taken when comparing and interpreting results. Table W10

There was very little difference in the mean hours of screen time (outwith school) for boys and girls (2.2 vs 2.1 hours on weekdays and 2.8 vs 2.6 hours on weekends). There was a marked difference in the proportion of children watching 4 or more hours per day on weekdays compared to weekends. 15% of boys watched 4 or more hours per day on weekdays compared to 30% at weekends. The comparable figures for girls were 14% and 23%. Mean hours of screen time increased with age with girls aged 13-15 spending twice as long at a screen as 2-4 year olds. A similar, but less marked pattern was seen for boys. Table W11

GP consultations among those with cardiovascular conditions

A quarter of men and almost a third of women with a CVD condition had consulted a GP in the past two weeks - the majority on only one occasion. The average number of GP consultations per year among those with a CVD condition was 8.6 for men and 10.9 for women. The mean number of consultations generally increased with age. Table W12

More than half of men and women with CVD had attended hospital as an outpatient/day patient in the past year (54% of men and women) and 22% had attended as an inpatient. 29% of men had undergone surgery for a heart condition compared to 19% of women. Table W13

Sexual Orientation

Adults were asked to describe their sexual orientation. Of those who answered the majority of men (96%) and women (97%) reported they were heterosexual with 1% reporting that they were bisexual and 1% gay or lesbian. The numbers in individual age categories were too small to identify any clear patterns by age. Table W14

Sexual Health

Men were more likely to report they were sexually active than women (66% and 58% respectively), with a marked decrease in sexual activity from age 65 and over for both men and women. Both men and women aged 16-24 were less likely to report they were sexually active than adults aged 25 to 54. Table W15

The most common form of contraception among men was the condom (25%), sterilisation (22%) or using a contraceptive pill (18%), whereas women were most likely to report sterilisation (23%), using a contraceptive pill (20%), or using a condom (17%). Three in ten adults (31% of men and 30% of women) reported not using any method of contraception. The younger age groups were far more likely to use some method of contraception, and this decreased markedly with age. Younger women (aged under 35) were more likely to report using a contraceptive pill or a condom, while older women (aged 35 to 64) were more likely to use sterilisation as a method of contraception. Table W16

Location of Physical Activity

Adults were asked which places they had used for physical activity and were able to record multiple answers. The most common location for both men and women was pavements and streets in their local area (65% of men and 70% of women). This was followed by home or garden (39% of men, 38% of women), an open space or park (29% of men and 26% of women), and a woodland, forest or tree covered park (27% of men and 23% of women). Table W17

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

4% of men and 5% of women reported having doctor diagnosed COPD. Prevalence increased with age with the highest prevalence among men and women aged 65 and over (8% to 10%). Table W18

Child Physical Activity

Excluding physical activity at school, more boys than girls reported high levels of physical activity (68% versus 62%). There was no clear pattern by age for boys with the 8-10 and 2-4 age groups the most likely to report high levels of activity and the 11-12 group the least likely. In girls the proportion reporting high levels of physical activity ranged between 63% and 75% for ages 2 to 10, then declined sharply to 36% for those aged 13-15. Table W19

The distribution of the number of days children do physical activity at school is very similar for boys and girls. A quarter of children (23% of boys and 26% of girls) do not do physical activity at school on even one day a week, with the highest proportion engaging in physical activity at school on two days a week (40% of boys and girls). The proportion of girls doing no physical activity at school increases with age with 19% of 4-6 year olds doing none compared with 36% of 13-15 year olds. 13-15 year old boys are the most likely to have done no physical activity at school (27%) but the proportion across the younger age groups is similar. Table W20

Diet Quality

A dietary quality index (DQI) based on the 2003 survey was developed on behalf of the Food Standards' Agency in Scotland as a means of summarising the breadth of information collected on eating habits. The DQI ranges from 0 - 100, with higher DQI scores indicative of diets that correspond more closely to the dietary recommendations set out in Scotland and covered by questions in the survey. The following analysis presents both mean DQI scores and quintiles of the index. The quintiles are a relative measure based on the distribution of the data collected; they do not represent an external threshold of diet quality. Therefore while adults in the highest quintile can be said to have higher quality diets than those in the lower quintiles, they do not necessarily have diets that are completely consistent with diet recommendations. See chapter 5 of the 2009 annual report for more detail on the DQI.

All of the adult DQI tables are based on the combined 2008 and 2010 datasets as the adult eating habits questions are only asked every second year in the survey.

The mean DQI score for all adults was 52.5 and was slightly higher for women (53.8) than for men (50.9). Mean DQI scores increased with age up till the age of 74 and decreased slightly in the 75 and over age group. This general pattern was evident for both men and women. As with the mean DQI scores, the proportions of adults in the highest and lowest DQI quintiles varied with age with diet quality increasing with increasing age up till the age of 74. For example, 32% of 16-24 year olds were in the lowest DQI quintile compared to 12% of those aged 65-74. Conversely only 11% of 16-24 year olds were in the highest DQI quintile compared to 24% of 65-74 year olds. Table W21

The mean DQI score was highest for adults living in managerial and professional households (55.5 for men and 58.8 for women) and was lowest for those living in semi-routine and routine households (47.8 for men and 50.8 for women). The proportion of men in managerial and professional households who were in the lowest DQI quintile (representing the poorest diets) was only 15% compared to 29% of those in semi-routine and routine households. Table W22

Diet quality was highest in adults in the highest income quintile (DQI mean of 57.0 for men and 58.2 for women). For both men and women mean DQI scores were similar in the four remaining quintiles with the 5th (lowest) quintile having the lowest DQI score for men (48.6) and the 4th quintile having the lowest score for women (51.5). The proportion of men in the highest income households who were in the highest DQI quintile (representing the higher quality diets) was 26% compared with only 11% of those in the lowest income households. Table W23

The mean diet quality index score was lowest among men and women in the most deprived SIMD quintile (47.8 for men and 50.0 for women) and highest among those in the least deprived quintile (55.0 for men and 60.0 for women). Only 7% of women in the least deprived quintile were in the lowest DQI quintile compared with 25% of women in the most deprived quintile. A similar but less marked pattern was seen for men. Table W24

Men and women whose highest qualifications were degree/HND/HNC level had better quality diets than those with no qualifications (56.7 versus 48.9 for men and 58.8 versus 50.6 for women). Table W25

Those who had high levels of physical activity (at least 30 mins on 5 or more days per week) had higher DQI scores than those with low or medium levels of physical activity. Men with high levels of physical activity had a mean DQI score of 53.4 compared to 51.8 and 49.5 for those with medium and low levels of physical activity. The scores for women were 57.8, 54.7 and 52.5 respectively. Table W26

Men who ate a main meal together as a family 7 or more times a week had the highest DQI score (53.0) followed by those who ate together 5-6 times per week (52.9) and those who lived alone (52.5). Men who ate together 1-2 times per week had the lowest DQI score of 45.9. Women who lived alone had the highest DQI score (56.7) followed by those who ate together 7 or more times per week (53.7 - 53.9). Those who ate together 1-2 times per week had the lowest mean DQI score (49.3). it should be noted that the sample sizes for individual categories are relatively small and therefore care should be taken when comparing and interpreting results. Table W27

Men and women who spent more 4 or more hours at a screen on an average day (including television viewing or using a computer or games console other than at work, school or college) had lower mean DQI scores than those who spent less time. Men with 4+ hours of screen time had a mean DQI score of 48.6 compared to 53.8 for those with 0-2 hours. The equivalent figures for women were 51.0 and 56.6. Table W28

Those with very good or good self-assessed general health had higher DQI scores on average than those who reported poor or very poor health. (52.4 versus 47.5 for men and 55.8 versus 50.8 for women). Table W29