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Supplementary Web Tables 2009

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These statistics were published on 28 September 2010.

SUMMARY

Age Standardisation

All socio-demographic analyses for adults - by NS-SEC, equivalised household income and Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) - are age-standardised to ensure that the results are not confounded by the different age profiles of the sub-groups. The tables report both the observed and the age-standardised figures but all percentages referred to in the text are standardised. The same is true for any tables which do not include an age breakdown.

For further details of each of the socio-demographic measures and age-standardisation please refer to the Glossary in the main report.

Trust

Levels of trust are very similar for men and women both in general and in the neighbourhood. 47% of men and 46% of women felt that most people can be trusted whilst 56% of men and 57% of women felt that most of the people in your neighbourhood can be trusted. The percentage of men and women who believe most people in their neighbourhood can be trusted increases with age for both men and women, with over double the level for those age 75+ (76%) compared to 16-24 year olds (37%). The percentage of women who believe most people can be trusted also increases with age, but for men the pattern is less clear. Table W1

Involvement in Local Community

Men are slightly less involved in the local community than women at all ages except 16-24, with 24% of men involved in the local community a great deal or a fair amount compared to 28% of women. Despite this men and women feel they have the same levels of influence on decisions affecting the local area (20% of men and women strongly agree or agree that they can influence decisions affecting their local area). Table W2

Contact with others

Across all ages women are more likely than men to have contact with others at least once a week (97% versus 91%). For women levels of contact are fairly consistent across age groups, ranging from 95% to 98% having contact with others at least once a week, whereas for men there is a U-shaped pattern, levels are highest in the younger and older age groups (94%) dropping to 84% of men age 45-54.

Women are slightly more likely than men to have 3 or more people to turn to if they had a personal crisis (90% and 86% respectively). For women this figure was similar across ages 16-74 ranging from 90% to 93% but dropped considerably for the 75+ age group to 80%. For men, 16-24 year olds were most likely to have 3 or more people to turn to in a personal crisis (95%) with similar levels in all other age groups ranging from 83% - 88%. Table W3

Unfair Treatment, Discrimination and Harassment

11% of adults experienced unfair treatment or discrimination in the last 12 months with no real difference between men (11%) and women (12%). This was more common in younger age groups with men aged 25-34 and women aged 16-24 most likely to report unfair treatment or discrimination. The most common form of discrimination was due to age and was mostly experienced by 16-24 year olds with 6% of men and 11% of women in this age group having experienced this. Nationality and accent were the next most common reasons for discrimination or unfair treatment. Table W4

Men and women experienced similar levels of harassment or abuse in the last 12 months (8% of men, 7% of women), and levels generally decreased with increasing age (across all adults: 12% of those age 16-24 compared with 4% of those age 75+ had experienced harassment or abuse in the last 12 months). Table W5

There is a generally decreasing trend with increasing age for both men and women of experiencing unfair treatment, discrimination or harassment in the last 12 months, from 21% of all adults age 16-24 to 5% of all adults age 75+. Overall 15% of adults experienced unfair treatment, discrimination or harassment in the last 12 months (14% of men, 15% of women). The most commonly occurring causes of the unfair treatment, discrimination or harassment were age (3% of all adults), sex (2% of all adults) and accent (2% of all adults). Table W6

Accidents

The rate of accidents has decreased since 1995 for both men and women, with a sharper decline for men. Women still have less accidents than men, but the gap is closing (1995: men: 24 per 100, women: 15 per 100; 2009: men: 13 per 100, women: 11 per 100). This has been driven by the drop in accident rate amongst men age 16-35. When considering the accident rate by age there is a U-shaped pattern, with the highest accident rate amongst the youngest and oldest (2009 men: 16-24: 19 per 100, 75+: 15 per 100; 2009 women: 16-24: 22 per 100, 75+: 22 per 100). Table W7

Only 1% of both men and women suffered 2 or more accidents in the last 12 months. Adults age 16-24 are most likely to have had at least one accident in the last 12 months, with 17% of men and 19% of women age 16-24 having had at least one accident in the last 12 months. The proportion of adults who have no accidents remains fairly constant for both men and women age 25-74 (range for men: 88% - 90%, range for women: 91% - 94%) before dropping slightly for those age 75+ (87% of men, 83% of women). Table W8

Of those who had an accident in the last 12 months, by far the most common cause was falling, slipping or tripping (53% of all adults; 46% of men, 60% of women). Men were more likely to have a sports or recreational accident (17% of men, 10% of women) and a lifting accident (7% of men, 2% of women). Table W9

The most common outcomes of accidents were straining or twisting a part of the body (31% of all adults who had an accident in the last 12 months), bruising, pinching or crushing a part of the body (30%) and swelling or tenderness in some part of the body (28%). The largest difference between the sexes was in the proportion bruising, pinching or crushing a part of the body (20% of men, 41% of women). Table W10

Children's accidents

The overall child accident rate has declined slightly over time but not significantly (from 21 per 100 in 1998 to 19 per 100 in 2009). Boys were more likely to have had an accident than girls (22 per 100 compared with 15 per 100) and older children were more likely than younger children to have had an accident. Table W11

In 2009 slightly more girls than boys had no accidents in the last 12 months (87% of girls, 84% of boys). There was a decline in the proportion of both boys and girls having no accidents after age 0-1. Among girls the proportion having no accidents remained fairly constant after age 2 (range: 83% - 89%), whereas for boys there is a sharp decline at age 12 (range age 2-11: 83% - 92%, age 12-15: 72%). Of those who do have at least one accident in the last 12 months, boys are more likely to have more than one accident. Table W12

Of those who had an accident in the last 12 months, by far the most common cause was falling, slipping or tripping (58% of all children; 48% of boys, 72% of girls), as it was for adults, followed by sports or recreational accidents (29% of all children; 37% of boys, 18% of girls). Table W13

The most common outcomes of the accidents were cutting, piercing or grazing a part of the body (30% of all children who had an accident in the last 12 months), swelling or tenderness in some part of the body (28%) and bruising, pinching or crushing a part of the body (26%). The largest difference between the sexes was in the proportion with swelling or tenderness in some part of the body 30% of boys, 25% of girls). Table W14

GP Consultations and Hospital Utilisation

17% of adults had consulted their GP in the last 2 weeks with men less likely to do so than women (14% versus 21%). For women, there was little variation by age, however, older men were more likely to have consulted their GP recently than younger men. These patterns have remained broadly consistent over time. The mean number of GP consultations per year remained fairly constant for women, ranging from 6 to 8 over all age groups, whereas for men there was an increase at ages 45-54. Over all ages women have almost twice as many GP consultations as men (7 versus 4 respectively). Tables W15 and W17

Both men and women were more likely to have attended hospital as an outpatient during the last 12 months (34% and 40% respectively) than as an inpatient (9% and 13%). For men, the likelihood of attending hospital generally increased with age for both outpatients and inpatients. For women age was less of a factor for inpatients, possibly due to younger women attending hospital to give birth. Table W16

Carers

Women were more likely than men to provide regular help or care for any sick, disabled or frail person inside or outside their home (14% and 10%, respectively), with these levels remaining similar to those observed in 2008. Across all adults the proportion providing regular care increases up to age 64, then decreases. Table W18

Adults age 16-44 who were carers had worse mental wellbeing as measured by WEMWBS than those who were not carers, with a much larger effect for women than men (female carers scored 2.8 points lower than female non-carers). Adults age 45 and over who were carers had slightly better mental health than those who were not carers, with a larger difference among 45-64 year olds than those age 65+. Table W19

Dental Health

Women were more likely than men to have no natural teeth (14% versus 11%). The likelihood of having all natural teeth declined with age, ranging from 99% to 100% among 16-24 year olds to 19% to 20% among those aged 75 and over. Table W20

Men were more likely to report feeling 'very/fairly' happy with the appearance of their teeth than women (72% versus 68%), with the proportion decreasing with age. Overall, just under a fifth of men and women reported feeling very happy with the appearance of their teeth. Table W21

Alcohol

36% of men and 32% of women reported that they were most likely to drink once or twice a week. The proportion of men who drank on 3 or more days a week was greater for those aged 35 and over compared with younger age groups (ranging from 30% to 41% compared with 21% for those under 35). The pattern for women was fairly similar although less strong (ranging from 18% to 24% for those aged 35 to 74 and over compared with 12% for those under aged 35 and 14% aged 75+). Almost twice as many men as women drank on 5 or more days a week (14% and 8% respectively) with the proportions increasing with age (24% of men aged 65 and over and ranging from 15% to 17% of women aged 55 and over). Conversely, participants in the older age groups (aged 65 and over) were also the most likely not to drink at all. Table W22

Men were more likely to drink normal strength beer, lager, stout, cider or shandy with 8.7 units on average per week whereas women were most likely to drink wine with 4.2 units on average consumed per week. Spirits were more likely to be drunk by younger women with the highest consumption among 16-24 year olds and consumption generally decreasing with age. The pattern for men was less clear with the highest consumption of spirits among the 16-24 year olds followed by the 65-74 year old group. The highest consumers of wine were women aged between 34 and 54 and men aged between 45 and 64. Table W23

Men in managerial and professional or intermediate households are less likely to have 2 or more problem drinking indicators or to have been drunk at least once a week in the last 3 weeks than those in other groups. The pattern was less clear for women where those in intermediate or semi-routine and routine households are most likely to have 2 or more problem drinking indicators and to have been drunk at least once a week in the last 3 weeks. Table W24

Men in the lowest income quintile were almost twice as likely to have reported 2 or more problem drinking indicators than those in the highest quintile (20% versus 11%), with a similar pattern for women (16% versus 8%). The same is true for those reporting 1 or more physical dependency indicator (men: 17% versus 8%, women: 10% versus 5%), and being drunk at least once a week in the last 3 weeks (men: 29% versus 15%, women: 14% versus 5%). There was no clear pattern between income and being drunk at least once in the last 3 months. Table W25

The proportion of men with 2 or more problem drinking indicators increased with increasing deprivation, but the pattern for women is less clear. For men, the proportion reporting one or more physical dependency indicator was highest in the most deprived quintile (16%) with the level fairly constant for the other quintiles (8% - 11%). For women there is no clear pattern, but the least deprived quintile had the lowest proportion of women reporting one or more physical dependency indicator. The proportions who were drunk at least once in the last 3 months are similar across the SIMD quintiles. Table W26

GP consultations among those with cardiovascular conditions

Almost a quarter of men and almost a third of women with a CVD condition had consulted a GP in the past two weeks - the majority on only one occasion. The average number of GP consultations per year among those with a CVD condition was 8.8 for men and 10.9 for women. There was no clear pattern with age. Table W27

More than half of men and women with CVD had attended hospital as an outpatient/day patient in the past year (55% of men and 53% of women). Almost twice as many men had undergone surgery for a heart condition (38%) as women (20%). Table W28

Sexual Health

Adults were asked to describe their sexual orientation. Of those who answered the majority of men and women (98%) reported they were heterosexual with 1% reporting that they were bisexual and 1% gay or lesbian. The proportion of men indicating they were heterosexual remained fairly constant with age, whereas for women the proportion increased slightly with age. Table W29

Men were more likely to report they were sexually active than women (66% and 59% respectively), with a marked decrease in sexual activity from age 65 and over. Both men and women aged 16-24 were less likely to report they were sexually active than adults aged 25 to 54. Table W30

The most common form of contraception among men was the condom (21%), sterilisation (20%) or using a contraceptive pill (16%), whereas women were most likely to report sterilisation (21%), using a contraceptive pill (17%), or using a condom (14%). Almost three in ten adults (29% of men and women) reported not using any method of contraception. The younger age groups were far more likely to use some method of contraception, and this decreased markedly with age. Younger women (aged under 35) were more likely to report using a contraceptive pill or a condom, while older women (aged 35 to 64) were more likely to use sterilisation as a method of contraception. Table W31

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

3% of men and 4% of women reported having doctor diagnosed COPD. Prevalence increased with age with the highest prevalence among men in the 75 and over age group (13%). For women the highest prevalence was among the women age 65 and over (7%). Table W32

Child Physical Activity

Excluding physical activity at school, more boys than girls reported high levels of physical activity (70% versus 59%). In boys the proportion with a high level of physical activity remains fairly constant for ages 2 to 12 (range: 69% - 76%), and then decreases to 62% in boys age 13-15. In girls the level remains constant for ages 2 to 10 (67% to 68%), then declines to 55% at age 11-12 and 32% at age 13-15. Table W33

The distribution of the number of days children do physical activity at school is very similar for boys and girls. A quarter of children do not do physical activity at school on even one day a week, with the highest proportion engaging in physical activity at school on two days a week (36% of boys and 35% of girls). The proportion of children doing physical activity at school 5 or more days a week decreases with age for girls, but remains steady for boys. Table W34

Households Eating Together

Almost two thirds (65%) of children ate their main meal with other household members in the past week on 7 or more occasions. 10% of children ate their main meal with other household members on two or fewer occasions in the past week. The distributions are similar for boys and girls. Older children ate less of their main meals with other household members than younger children. Table W35