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Supplementary Web Tables 2011

The tables are available here

These statistics were published on 25 September 2012.

SUMMARY

Trust

Levels of trust are very similar for men and women both in general and in the neighbourhood. 47% of men and 46% of women felt that most people can be trusted whilst 58% of men and 57% of women felt that most of the people in their neighbourhood can be trusted. The percentage of men and women who believe most people in their neighbourhood can be trusted increases with age for both men and women, with around double the level for those age 75+ (75%) compared to 16-24 year olds (38%). The percentage of women who believe most people can be trusted also increases with age, but for men the pattern is less clear. Table W1

Involvement in Local Community

Men are slightly less involved in the local community than women at all ages except 25-34 and 75+, with 24% of men involved in the local community a great deal or a fair amount compared to 28% of women. Despite this men and women feel they have the same levels of influence on decisions affecting the local area (21% of men and women strongly agree or agree that they can influence decisions affecting their local area). Table W2

Contact with others

Across all ages women are more likely than men to have contact with others at least once a week (97% versus 91%). For women levels of contact are fairly consistent across age groups, ranging from 96% to 99% having contact with others at least once a week, whereas for men there is a U-shaped pattern, levels are highest in the younger and older age groups (93-96%) dropping to 86% of men age 45-54.

Women are slightly more likely than men to have 3 or more people to turn to if they had a personal crisis (90% and 87% respectively). For women this figure ranged from 90% to 95% across ages 16-74 but dropped considerably for the 75+ age group to 78%. For men, 16-34 year olds were most likely to have 3 or more people to turn to in a personal crisis (91-95%) with similar levels in all other age groups ranging from 84% - 86%. Table W3

Unfair Treatment, Discrimination and Harassment

11% of adults experienced unfair treatment or discrimination in the last 12 months with no difference between men and women (both 11%). This was more common in younger age groups with men aged 16-34 and women aged 16-24 most likely to report unfair treatment or discrimination. The most common form of discrimination was due to age and was mostly experienced by 16-24 year olds with 4% of men and 9% of women in this age group having experienced this. Nationality, accent – and for women, sex – were the next most common reasons for discrimination or unfair treatment. Table W4

Men and women experienced similar levels of harassment or abuse in the last 12 months (8% of men, 7% of women), and levels generally decreased with increasing age (across all adults: 10% of those age 16-24 compared with 2% of those age 75+ had experienced harassment or abuse in the last 12 months). Table W5

There is a generally decreasing trend with increasing age for both men and women of experiencing unfair treatment, discrimination or harassment in the last 12 months, from 21% of all adults age 16-24 to 4% of all adults age 75+. Overall 14% of adults experienced unfair treatment, discrimination or harassment in the last 12 months (14% of men, 15% of women). The most commonly occurring causes of the unfair treatment, discrimination or harassment were age (3% of all adults), nationality (2% of all adults) and accent (2% of all adults). Table W6

Mental Wellbeing

Mental wellbeing was highest among adults who had ‘very good’ self assessed health and declined in line with self assessed general health, from 52.3 on the WEMWBS scale to 37.2 among those with ‘very bad’ health. The pattern is similar among men and women. Table W7

Workplace Health

14% of adults reported finding their job very/extremely stressful (14% of men, 15% of women). The proportion of women with stressful jobs was between 15-17% for all ages 25-64, whereas the proportion of men was highest among those aged 16-24 (16%) and 35-44 (20%) and then declined with age. Table W8

On a scale of 1-10, where 10 represents being ‘extremely satisfied’, 65% of adults scored 6 or higher for their work-life balance. The proportions were similar among men and women, and increased with age. Between ages 16-54 the proportion scoring 6 or higher varied from 62-65%, rising to 81% of those aged 75+. Table W9

A quarter of adults reported ‘always/often’ having unrealistic time pressures at work. With similar results among men and women (27% and 26% respectively). Nearly a fifth (18% of men, 19% of women) report that relationships at work are strained. Table W10

Accidents

The rate of accidents has decreased since 1995 for both men and women, with a sharper decline for men. Women still have fewer accidents than men, but the gap is closing (1995: men: 24 per 100, women: 15 per 100; 2009/2011: men: 14 per 100, women: 12 per 100). This has been driven by the drop in accident rate amongst men age 16-35. When considering the accident rate by age there is a U-shaped pattern, with the highest accident rate amongst the youngest and oldest (2009/2011 men: 16-24: 17 per 100, 75+: 14 per 100; 2009 women: 16-24: 18 per 100, 75+: 20 per 100). Table W11

Only 1% of both men and women suffered 2 or more accidents in the last 12 months. Adults age 16-24 are most likely to have had at least one accident in the last 12 months, with 17% of men and 18% of women age 16-24 having had at least one accident in the last 12 months. The proportion of adults aged 25-74 who have no accidents remains fairly constant (between 89% - 92%) but is lower in the youngest and oldest age groups (85% age 16-24; 87% age 75+). Table W12

Of those who had an accident in the last 12 months, by far the most common cause was falling, slipping or tripping (49% of all adults; 44% of men, 55% of women). Men were more likely to have a sports or recreational accident (16% of men, 6% of women) and accidents from using a tool, implement or equipment (9% of men, 6% of women). Table W13

The most common outcomes of accidents were straining or twisting a part of the body (32% of all adults who had an accident in the last 12 months), bruising, pinching or crushing a part of the body (32%) and swelling or tenderness in some part of the body (31%). The largest difference between the sexes was in the proportion bruising, pinching or crushing a part of the body (26% of men, 37% of women). Table W14

GP Consultations and Hospital Utilisation

Men were less likely have consulted their GP in the last two weeks than women (14% versus 21%). For women, there was little variation by age, however, older men were more likely to have consulted their GP recently than younger men. These patterns have remained broadly consistent over time. Women have more GP consultations per year than men (7.0 versus 4.0) The mean number of GP consultations per year remained fairly constant for women of all ages, ranging from 6 to 8, whereas men aged 55 and over consulted their GP more often than younger men. Table W15

Both men and women were more likely to have attended hospital as an outpatient during the last 12 months (31% and 38% respectively) than as an inpatient (7% and 12%). For men, the likelihood of attending hospital generally increased with age for both outpatients and inpatients. For women age was less of a factor for inpatients, possibly due to younger women attending hospital to give birth. Table W15

Carers

Women were more likely than men to provide regular help or care for any sick, disabled or frail person inside or outside their home (14% and 11% respectively). This level has been stable for women, but has grown from 9% of men in 2009. The proportion providing regular care increases with age up to age 64, then decreases. Carers aged 16+ had slightly lower mental wellbeing than those who were not carers, reporting an average score 0.7 points lower on the WEMWBS scale. Tables W16 and W17

Dental Health        

Women were more likely than men to have no natural teeth (12% versus 9%). The likelihood of having only natural teeth declined with age, from 100% of adults ages 16-24 to 23% among those aged 75 and over. Table W18

71% of adults reported feeling very or fairly happy with the appearance of their teeth, with the proportion similar among men and women, and decreasing with age. Overall, just under a fifth of men and women reported feeling 'very' happy with the appearance of their teeth. Table W19

69% of adults have been to the dentist within the last year (65% of men and 73% of women). The proportion varies between 67%-78% for ages 16-54, and then declines with age to 52% among those aged 75+.  11% of adults were last at the dentist more than 5 years ago. The proportion increases from 3% of those aged 16-24 to 28% aged 75+. Table W20

Adults living in the least deprived areas were most likely to have visited the dentist in the last year (81%). The proportion falls in line with increasing deprivation, to 58% of adults in the most deprived areas. The proportion of adults who last visited the dentist more than 5 years ago likewise increases with increasing deprivation, from 7% in the least deprived areas to 16% in the most deprived. Table W21

The most common difficulties experienced when visiting the dentist were that treatment is too expensive (13% of adults), difficulty getting an appointment that suits (9%), and being unable to get treatment under the NHS (7%). These problems were shared by both men and women. Table W22

Alcohol

Men drank on average around twice as much alcohol each week than women (15.5 units per week compared to 7.5). Average weekly consumption for men was relatively stable across most age groups (between 14.6 and 16.6 units), but lower for those aged 75+ (10.4). For women the highest level of consumption was among those aged 16-24 (10.2 units per week), was broadly stable for ages 25-64 (between 7.0 and 8.7 units), and then declined for older age groups (women aged 75+ consumed 3.4 units per week). Men were more likely than women to drink normal strength beer, lager, stout, cider or shandy (7.8 units compared to 0.8), with these drinks accounting for around half of all male consumption. Wine consumption was higher among women than men (4.0 units compared to 3.5), and was the most common beverage in all age groups except for those aged 16-24. Spirits were the most commonly consumed beverage among women aged 16-24 and men aged 75+. Table W23

14% of adults drank on 6 or more days of the week in the highest income quintile, with the proportion declining broadly in line with income. The lowest proportion drinking on 6 or more days was in the 4th income quintile (7%), with a slightly higher figure among those with the lowest income (8%). This pattern was reflected in the results for women, but consumption by men showed less of a trend with the proportion between 13-15% for all groups except the highest earners (18%). Table W24

The average number of days on which adults drank alcohol declined in line with income for both men and women, from 3.1 days for all adults in the highest income quintile to 2.4 days in the lowest income quintile. This pattern is reflected for all adults, and men and women separately when examined by SIMD. Tables W24 and W25

11% of adults who currently drink scored on 2 or more indicators of potential problem drinking. The highest proportion was among those aged 25-34 (18%), declining to 3% of those aged 75+. This pattern was similar among men and women, but the proportions for men were higher (13% compared to 10%). The proportion scoring on 2 or more indicators increases in line with deprivation, with 11% of drinkers in the lease deprived quintile and 20% in the most deprived. This pattern holds for both men and women. Tables W26 and W27

Second-Hand Smoke

The percentage of adult non-smokers who are exposure to second-hand smoke in either their own and other people’s homes falls with decreasing deprivation, and likewise with increasing household income. A total of 26% of adults in the lowest income group are exposed to second-hand smoke in a home, falling to 11% in the highest income group. Exposure to second hand smoke in public places has a less clear pattern with regard to income or deprivation, but is slightly higher in the most deprived areas and among those with the lowest incomes. Tables W28 and 29

GP and hospital consultations among those with cardiovascular conditions

A quarter of men and almost a third of women with a CVD condition had consulted a GP in the past two weeks - the majority on only one occasion. The average number of GP consultations per year among those with a CVD condition was 8.8 for men and 10.5 for women. The mean number of consultations generally increased with age for men, and increased until age 45-54 for women before declining for older age groups. Tables W30 and W30a

More than half of men and women with CVD had attended hospital as an outpatient/day patient in the past year (54% of men and 55% of women) and 22% had attended as an inpatient. 33% of men had undergone surgery for a heart condition compared to 15% of women. Tables W31 and W31a

Sexual Health

Men were more likely to report they were sexually active than women (66% and 58% respectively), with a marked decrease in sexual activity from age 65 and over for both men and women. Both men and women aged 16-24 were less likely to report they were sexually active than adults aged 25 to 54. Table W32

The most common forms of contraception among men were the condom (23%), sterilisation (20%) or using a contraceptive pill (18%), whereas women were most likely to report sterilisation (21%), using a contraceptive pill (20%), or using a condom (17%). A third of adults (33% of men and 32% of women) reported not using any method of contraception. The younger age groups were far more likely to use some method of contraception, and this decreased markedly with age. Younger women (aged under 35) were more likely to report using a contraceptive pill or a condom, while older women (aged 35 to 64) were more likely to use sterilisation as a method of contraception. Table W33

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

3% of men and 4% of women reported having doctor diagnosed COPD. Prevalence increased with age with the highest prevalence among men and women aged 65 and over (7% to 9%). Table W34

Blood Pressure

Mean blood pressure among men aged 16+ was 129.7 (systolic) over 73.6 (diastolic), and for women was 125.9 over 73.6. Blood pressure generally increased with age for both men and women. There is no clear trend in systolic blood pressure measurements since 2003 (or since 1995 for ages 16-64), but there appears to have been an increase in average diastolic blood pressure for both men and women. Table W35