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Scottish Draft Budget 2013-14

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Chapter 8 Culture and External Affairs

PORTFOLIO RESPONSIBILITIES

The Culture and External Affairs portfolio includes policy on culture, the new and historic built environment, Scotland's National Collections, performing companies and documentary heritage and European and International affairs. The portfolio also includes the budget for the Young Scots Fund to support youth employment and emerging young talent in sport, enterprise and creativity, working across other Scottish Government portfolios.

The portfolio seeks to promote Scotland's interests and identity at home and abroad and contributes to delivering Scotland's economic ambition, investing capital in Scotland's cultural and heritage infrastructure. It aims to enhance the quality of life for Scotland's communities through maximising access to high-quality cultural events and opportunities and to help young people's learning and creativity through engagement with culture and heritage. It promotes, protects and provides access to Scotland's historic environment through Historic Scotland and promotes the delivery of high-quality places and buildings to support Scotland's communities.

SUPPORTING RECOVERY AND INCREASING SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH

The Scottish Government is developing strong relationships with a carefully selected number of countries to bring a sharp economic focus to our work and to strengthen Scotland's position in the world. Our International Framework is supported by a series of targeted plans with China, India, Pakistan, South Asia, Canada and the USA.

With the EU, North America and China of key strategic importance to Scotland and the economy, we are maintaining our on-the-ground presence in Brussels, Washington, Toronto and Beijing. Our presence in these key markets promotes Scotland as a modern nation with a competitive advantage, supported by a modern economy with rapidly growing sectors like low carbon technologies, creative industries, cutting-edge life sciences and food and drink.

The Action Plan on European Engagement supports the International Framework and sits alongside the targeted plans for countries outside of Europe. It highlights the EU policy priorities of energy and climate change; marine environment; research and creativity; and freedom, security and justice where the Scottish Government has a key role to play in enhancing Scotland's profile in Europe. This focuses Scotland's engagement where we have specific devolved interest and clear expertise and can benefit fully from the opportunities available. The EU provides Scotland with access to the world's largest trading market - the Single Market of almost half a billion consumers - and is our most important overseas export market, worth £9.8 billion in 2010.

The USA remains Scotland's largest overseas tourism market and exports to the USA alone are worth more than £3 billion a year to the Scottish economy, with food and drink exports to the USA growing almost 30 per cent in 2011 and strongly contributing to the Scottish Government's ambition to grow Scotland's exports 50 per cent by 2017.

Scotland is well established as a leading events destination. Events yield significant benefits for Scotland with clear evidence that our continued support for major events can drive economic growth and generate a positive impact and legacy that enhance our international profile and reputation.

Scotland's Creative Industries Sector, one of the seven Growth Sectors in the Government Economic Strategy, contributes £2.7 billion to Scotland's economy with direct employment in the sector exceeding 70,000[1].

The impact of the arts and creative industries on local economies across Scotland is also significant, and highlights relative strengths of diverse sectors. Though Glasgow and Edinburgh account for 40 per cent of all employees in the arts and creative industries - according to recent research[2] - other areas also record high levels of employment in those sectors: including the Borders, where textiles and fashion feature as key; Orkney where it is crafts and heritage; and in Shetland where it is fashion, textiles and heritage. Dundee is known the world over as a centre of excellence in computer games development, with computer games, software and electronic publishing worth over £1 billion to the Scottish economy in 2010[3].

The architecture sector adds to economic growth through the export of services. Innovation in Scottish architecture is key to developing a sustainable future, creating green jobs, reducing carbon emissions and contributing to Scotland's reputation as the green powerhouse of Europe. The role of architecture is also important in supporting and developing Scotland's communities. Our best Scottish architecture reflects our creativity and innovation and sense of cultural identity.

To this end, we are developing a new policy on architecture and place making which responds to the changing nature of built environment issues. The new policy will encourage the creation of buildings and places which succeed in bringing together activities and services for the people of Scotland to fulfil their potential in business and society.

Through the provision of technical and scientific advice Historic Scotland is leading on improving the energy efficiency of Scotland's 460,000 traditional buildings and making a significant contribution to the Government's carbon reduction targets. In its regulatory role it is continuing to improve and simplify the planning system, and working in partnership with Glasgow School of Art, it is enhancing Scotland's reputation for innovation and excellence at home and internationally through the 3D laser scanning of five international sites as well as the five World Heritage Sites in Scotland - the Scottish Ten project.

The National Records of Scotland has a wide and diverse community of stakeholders and plays a central role in the cultural, social and economic life of Scotland, supporting several of the Scottish Government's key National Outcomes and measuring its Population Purpose Target.

Our National Collections, National Performing Companies, Creative Scotland, Historic Scotland and the National Records of Scotland all make a vital contribution to supporting recovery and increasing sustainable economic growth by attracting increasing numbers of visitors to Scotland through their activities for cultural, heritage and ancestral tourism.

There are over 340 museums and galleries in Scotland caring for more than 12 million objects. These attract an estimated 23.5 million visits every year, generating around £660 million for the economy. The wider heritage sector employs over 10,000 people including nearly 4,000 in museums.

OUR PRIORITIES

We are increasing our capital support for new and improved cultural and heritage infrastructure, in line with the Infrastructure Investment Plan, providing more opportunities for the construction sector and ensuring that Scotland can offer the best facilities and venues to the people of Scotland and visitors from abroad. We are continuing to support cultural opportunities and cultural excellence through investment in Creative Scotland, the National Performing Companies and the National Collections.

Building on the success of the 2012 Year of Creative Scotland we will continue to support the themed years through contributing to the Year of Natural Scotland in 2013 and supporting activity in the development, promotion and delivery of our next Year of Homecoming in 2014.

We will develop our plans to capitalise on the Commonwealth Games in 2014 to develop and create a cultural programme and a long-lasting, meaningful cultural legacy that: reinforces the contribution that a strong, vibrant cultural offer brings to the lives of people across Scotland; boosts tourism; and enhances Scotland's international image.

We will maintain our strong relationships with institutions and Governments within Europe, with the UK Government and the wider international community which are paying dividends for Scotland, providing increased opportunities to expand trade and support economic growth. Key areas of activity include climate change and energy. Successful Ministerial visits to China, the Gulf, Japan, South Korea, Norway, Canada and the USA in the past 12 months have led to tangible outcomes, including a commitment to joint working with China; the promotion to the Gulf countries of £40 billion of low carbon investment opportunities (in Scotland); and £80 million planned investment in Scotland by Norway's Marine Harvest.

Internationally, we will continue to promote Scotland as a responsible nation in the world, maximising its influence within the EU and building on mutually beneficial links with other countries including Canada, the USA, China and India.

In 2013-14 we will:

  • increase capital investment in the culture sector with particular support for the Victoria and Albert (V&A) at Dundee project, and the redevelopment of the Royal Concert Hall and Theatre Royal in Glasgow for Royal Scottish National Orchestra and Scottish Opera respectively for the 2014 Commonwealth Games;
  • proceed with significant investment in youth opportunities through the Young Scots Fund;
  • increase investment in Scotland's heritage with £1 million additional funding for historic properties, significant funding for the Bannockburn Visitor Centre, the National Conservation Centre and grant-aided projects with direct benefit for the heritage sector;
  • work with 'Team Scotland' partners, in particular VisitScotland and EventScotland, to maximise the legacy of the 2012 Ryder Cup in Medinah, USA as well as the 'Winning Years' campaign to promote Scotland's Year of Homecoming 2014 and the 2014 Ryder Cup at Gleneagles;
  • promote Scotland's creative industries and cultural excellence internationally by collaborating with Creative Scotland, Scotland's National Performing Companies and Scotland's National Collections on promotional and public diplomacy activity in our priority countries abroad; and
  • maintain our International Development budget at highest ever levels (£9 million per year) despite a stringent financial climate. This funding is helping to make a real difference to some of the world's poorest people.

Draft Budget for 2013-14 and spending plans for 2014-15 are set out below:

Table 8.01: Detailed spending plans (Level 2)

Level 2 2012-13
Budget

£m
2013-14
Draft
Budget
£m
2014-15
Plans

£m
Europe and External Affairs 15.9 15.7 15.5
Culture 149.2 148.2 147.3
Historic Scotland 45.3 43.6 35.7
Young Scots Fund 5.4 12.5 7.5
National Records of Scotland 22.0 20.8 19.5
Total Portfolio 237.8 240.8 225.5
of which:
DEL Resource 222.9 223.8 212.9
DEL Capital 14.9 17.0 12.6
AME - - -

Table 8.02: Detailed spending plans (Level 2 real terms) at 2012-13 prices

Level 2 2012-13
Budget

£m
2013-14
Draft
Budget
£m
2014-15
Plans

£m
Europe and External Affairs 15.9 15.3 14.8
Culture 149.2 144.6 140.2
Historic Scotland 45.3 42.5 34.0
Young Scots Fund 5.4 12.2 7.1
National Records of Scotland 22.0 20.3 18.6
Total Portfolio 237.8 234.9 214.6
of which:
DEL Resource 222.9 218.3 202.6
DEL Capital 14.9 16.6 12.0
AME - - -

Europe and External Affairs

Table 8.03: More detailed categories of spending (Level 3)

Level 3 2012-13
Budget

£m
2013-14
Draft
Budget
£m
2014-15
Plans

£m
Major Events and Themed Years 1.5 1.6 1.7
International Relations 14.4 14.1 13.8
Total Level 2 15.9 15.7 15.5
of which:
DEL Resource 15.9 15.7 15.5
DEL Capital - - -
AME - - -

What the budget does

The Europe and External Affairs budget supports the promotion of Scotland, its interests and identity at home and abroad. It contributes to the promotion of Scotland as a responsible nation in the world, including our international development work, in maximising Scotland's influence within the EU and building on mutually beneficial links with other countries including Canada, the USA, China and India. The budget also supports the attraction of fresh talent to live, study and work in Scotland and activity to stimulate growth in our events industry.

In 2013-14 we will:

  • maintain the International Development Fund at £9 million, enabling us to provide support to development projects in Malawi, Zambia, Tanzania, Rwanda and South Asia, covering themes such as health, education, renewable energy and economic development;
  • take forward the manifesto commitment to implement the USA, Canada and South Asia Country Plans as well as updating and implementing the China Plan;
  • contribute to Year of Natural Scotland in 2013, a year in which Scotland's people and its visitors will celebrate the country's outstanding natural beauty, landscapes and biodiversity;
  • work with 'Team Scotland' partners to support activity in the development, promotion and delivery of our next Year of Homecoming in 2014. and the 2014 Ryder Cup at Gleneagles to North American travellers and Scotland's Diaspora;
  • deliver the annual Scotland Week programme on budget and at half the cost of previous Tartan Weeks;
  • work with 'Team Scotland' partners to deliver a year-round programme of promotional activity that promotes Scotland as a great place to live, learn, visit, work, do business and invest;
  • contribute to the running costs of the British-Irish Council Standing Secretariat now successfully established in Edinburgh;
  • establish a programme of activities in Edinburgh and Brussels promoting Scottish Government sectoral priorities and projecting Scotland as a dynamic contributor to EU policy making;
  • support a programme of seminars to promote links with the Nordic countries; and
  • maintain productive and proactive engagement with the UK Government and key EU stakeholders focused on delivering Scottish Government EU priorities.

Culture

Table 8.04: More detailed categories of spending (Level 3)

Level 3 2012-13
Budget

£m
2013-14
Draft
Budget
£m
2014-15
Plans

£m
Creative Scotland and Other Arts 51.9 51.7 51.4
Cultural Collections 73.4 72.9 72.7
National Performing Companies 23.9 23.6 23.2
Total Level 2 149.2 148.2 147.3
of which:
DEL Resource 137.9 136.2 135.2
DEL Capital 11.3 12.0 12.1
AME - - -

What the budget does

The Culture budget contributes towards enhancing the quality of life for Scotland's communities through maximising participation in high-quality cultural events and opportunities, supporting a wide range of Government commitments relating to culture. It is widely accepted that participating in creative activities such as making, or engaging with, music or art can lead to a broad range of positive personal and social outcomes.

Budget changes

£1m/£1m additional capital funding in 2013-14 and 2014-15 to Creative Scotland to enable improvement of the country's cultural infrastructure and £2.4m/£3.9m additional capital for maintenance and refurbishment projects for the Cultural Collections.

In 2013-14 we will:

  • continue our investment in cultural infrastructure, in particular our capital funding commitment to the V&A at Dundee project and the redevelopment of the Glasgow Royal Concert Hall and Theatre Royal in advance of the Commonwealth Games in 2014, as set out in the Infrastructure Investment Plan;
  • continue to provide support for the National Museums, National Galleries and National Library of Scotland and the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historic Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS), continuing our commitment to the principle of free public access to the national collections;
  • continue to provide over £20 million in revenue funding for the five National Performing Companies, supporting their artistic and educational work;
  • provide Creative Scotland with over £34 million in core grant in aid to fund support for artists and cultural activity across all art-forms for the benefit of communities the length and breadth of Scotland, and an additional £1 million in capital to support improvement and development of cultural facilities across the country;
  • implement the Museums Strategy maximising the potential of collections across Scotland, strengthening their connections with communities and developing the skills of the sector: provide direct funding support of almost £0.85 million for key industrial museums;
  • maintain ring-fenced funding for the Youth Music Initiative (£10 million) to provide free music tuition for school children and for Arts and Business (£0.3 million) to help maximise private sector investment in the arts; and
  • continue the successful Edinburgh Festivals Expo Fund, providing £2 million to support showcasing Scottish talent, maintain £0.25 million in direct support for Festivals Edinburgh, and continue the International Touring Fund (£0.35 million) for the National Performing Companies to perform beyond Scotland's shores.

Historic Scotland

Table 8.05: More detailed categories of spending (Level 3)

Level 3 2012-13
Budget

£m
2013-14
Draft
Budget
£m
2014-15
Plans

£m
Operational Costs* 72.8 70.7 67.7
Capital Expenditure 3.1 3.9 -
Less income -30.6 -31.0 -32.0
Total Level 2 45.3 43.6 35.7
of which:
DEL Resource 42.2 39.7 35.7
DEL Capital 3.1 3.9 -
AME - - -

*Note: HS Operational Costs are now shown as one Level 3 figure.

What the budget does

Historic Scotland protects and promotes Scotland's historic environment, through the conservation and maintenance of 345 nationally significant historic properties and monuments in the care of Scottish Ministers and, as the largest operator of paid visitor attractions in Scotland, through the employment of over 1,100 staff around Scotland who help to maintain its position as a world-class visitor destination. In its work with VisitScotland and VisitBritain, it is a key player in supporting tourism in Scotland.

It provides advice on the special interest and management of the most important parts of Scotland's wider historic environment, including listed buildings, scheduled monuments, wreck sites, gardens and designed landscapes and battlefields, far beyond its 345 properties. It promotes cultural identity and associated community regeneration through designations, through educational programmes and through the Historic Environment Grants Programme. This Programme contributes funding for the repair of Scotland's most important historic buildings, the regeneration of historic areas and the enhancement of the quality of Scotland's historic city centres.

Historic Scotland, as Scotland's largest employer of stonemasons, also protects and supports traditional skills through its employment of skilled crafts people and its work with colleges, Sector Skills Councils and others, and through its Modern Apprentices contributes to our youth employment agenda.

Budget changes

Historic Scotland has received additional capital of £3.3 million in 2013-14 to invest in maintenance of its heritage assets and to allow an important grant repair project in the Western Isles at Lews Castle to proceed.

In 2013-14 we will:

  • complete, in partnership with the National Trust for Scotland, the Battle of Bannockburn project ready for its opening in 2014;
  • progress work on the National Conservation Centre enabling young people to learn traditional skills in a modern context, for completion in 2015;
  • invest an additional £1 million in maintenance of historic properties throughout Scotland, providing local opportunities for the construction sector and helping the efficient carbon management of the historic estate and benefiting cultural tourism, economic regeneration and pro-active maintenance of the estate;
  • invest in local regeneration throughout Scotland through grant schemes, refresh properties to improve visitor offering, and provide guidance on energy efficiency and on maintaining traditional buildings;
  • continue to explore all means of growing income from current and alternative sources to support our functions;
  • review processes and systems to identify further potential efficiencies, investing in the short term to deliver long-term savings; and
  • continue to carry out a fundamental review of the Scottish Historic Environment Policy to ensure it supports delivery of the Scottish Government's commitment to the historic environment and to sustainable economic growth.

Young Scots Fund

Table 8.06: More detailed categories of spending (Level 3)

Level 3 2012-13
Budget

£m
2013-14
Draft
Budget
£m
2014-15
Plans

£m
Young Scots Fund 5.4 12.5 7.5
Total Level 2 5.4 12.5 7.5
of which:
DEL Resource 5.4 12.5 7.5
DEL Capital - - -
AME - - -

What the budget does

The Young Scots Fund is a new initiative that will invest over four years in emerging young talent in sport, enterprise and creativity. We believe that to invest in our young people is an investment in a better future for Scotland. In 2012-13 we funded a graduate incentive programme with the Scottish Chambers of Commerce that looks to increase graduate recruitment in Scotland's small businesses; we are committed to invest in each of the three financial years to support up to 2,500 young people towards the labour market. The Young Scots Fund will be used to take forward a number of projects, including a National Indoor Football Centre, National Centre for Youth Arts and National Conservation Centre. It will also provide opportunities for developing, encouraging and building talent, for young Scots to excel and realise their potential as our future entrepreneurs, creative practitioners and sports champions.

In 2013-14 we will:

  • commence investment, through Historic Scotland, in the National Conservation Centre based in Stirling, focusing on reviving scarce technical skills and promoting best practice in conservation;
  • continue to invest to ensure that Scotland's young people, aged between 16-24, have access to a range of interventions to move them towards and into work; and
  • continue development of our plans for a National Football Academy.

National Records of Scotland

Table 8.07: More detailed categories of spending (Level 3)

Level 3 2012-13
Budget

£m
2013-14
Draft
Budget
£m
2014-15
Plans

£m
Operational Costs* 29.0 27.2 26.5
Capital Expenditure 0.5 1.1 0.5
Less retained income -7.5 -7.5 -7.5
Total Level 2 22.0 20.8 19.5
of which:
DEL Resource 21.5 19.7 19.0
DEL Capital 0.5 1.1 0.5
AME - - -

*Note: NRS Operational Costs are now shown as one level 3 figure.

What the budget does

The National Records of Scotland (NRS) plays an important role in cultural and economic life and its holdings are central to the nation's sense of identity.

NRS has assumed all of the functions of the former General Register Office for Scotland and National Archives of Scotland. The functions of NRS are to:

  • administer the registration of events such as births, deaths, marriages, civil partnerships, divorces and adoptions;
  • maintain the statutes relating to the formalities of marriage and the conduct of civil marriage;
  • take the Census of Scotland's population every ten years and prepare and publish demographic and other statistics;
  • make available to customers public records about individuals, and maintain for the Scottish Government the National Health Service Central Register (NHSCR);
  • select public records worthy of permanent preservation; acquire other historical records of national importance, and make suitable arrangements for the disposal of other material;
  • preserve to archival standards all records selected for permanent preservation in the NRS;
  • increase sustainable public access to the records; and
  • take the lead in the development of archival and records management practice in Scotland and provide advice to custodians of records outwith the NRS.

Budget changes

Additional capital funding of £0.6 million in 2013-14 to assist with essential maintenance and repairs.

In 2013-14 we will:

  • work in cooperation with local authorities to provide a network of Local Family History Centres where family historians will be able to access the same records as are available at the ScotlandsPeople Centre;
  • continue to expand the ScotlandsPeople service, in particular adding records (e.g. Valuation Rolls) in order to stimulate further ancestral research and potential tourism visits;
  • finalise the creation of the single ICT solution for NRS and ensure that we continue to use technology effectively to support our business, increase efficiencies and deliver better services to our customers;
  • conclude the publishing of results from Scotland's 2011 Census, in parallel with censuses in the other parts of the UK;
  • develop the data linkage service for Scotland (alongside other government departments) which will, over time, increase secure and acceptable data sharing; and
  • continue to investigate models for delivery of census type information in 2021, and offer advice to Scottish Ministers in 2014.