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Scottish Careers IAG Qualifications and CPD Framework Group - Meeting 2

SCOTTISH CAREERS IAG QUALIFICATIONS AND CPD FRAMEWORK GROUP [CFG - P3]

MONDAY 24 OCTOBER 2011

DEFINING THE CAREERS WORKFORCE IN SCOTLAND

Purpose

1. To bring together materials to inform a discussion on who comprises the careers workforce in Scotland.

2. To "clarify who makes up the careers workforce in Scotland" [Group paper 1].

Materials

3. Annex A - Job Titles from the LLUK publication Occupational Map For Career Guidance.

4. Annex B - Role Profiles/Job Description.

Actions

5. The Group is invited to discuss who, for the purposes of developing a Careers IAG Qualifications and CPD framework, forms the careers workforce in Scotland.

Scottish Government

October 2011

ANNEX A

EXTRACT FROM OCCUPATIONAL MAP FOR CAREER GUIDANCE[1]

There are a range of job titles that are used for people who work within the Career Guidance occupation, the most common of which is Careers Adviser. However, some organisations structure individuals level of occupational development in reference to job titles and refer to new employees as Junior or Trainee Careers Advisers. There are also many other job titles that exist within the Career Guidance occupation which vary depending on the specific focus of the organisation and the national context. Such as:

• Adult Careers Adviser

• Adult Guidance Adviser

• Advice and Guidance Worker

• Career and Progression Adviser

• Career Development Services Coordinator

• Careers and Enterprise Manager

• Careers and Jobshop Manager

• Careers Adviser

• Careers Adviser (Education)

• Careers Adviser (LDD)

• Careers and Employability Adviser

• Careers Coach

• Careers Consultant

• Careers Guidance Adviser

• Careers Information and Advice Worker

• Careers Manager

• Careers Service Manager

• Director of Careers Service

• Director, Careers and Student Employment

• Educational Adviser

• Education Business Advisers

• Employability Adviser

• Graduate Careers Adviser

• Guidance Adviser

• HE Careers Adviser

• Head of Careers

• Head of Employability

• Head of Guidance

• Head of IAG

• Head of Learner Support

• IAG Adviser

• Learner Adviser Officer

• Learner Services Manager

• Lecturer Careers Education and Guidance

• Lifelong Learning Adviser

• Next Step Adviser

• Personal Adviser

• Senior Careers Adviser

• Skills Development Adviser

• Special Needs Careers Adviser

• Student Adviser

• Trainee Careers Adviser

• Youth Gateway Advisers

It is important to note the high level of diversity in the job titles covered here. This broad proliferation of roles, which are considered to include an element of Career Guidance, serves to maintain the fragmentation and confusion over who actually delivers what. For example, Careers Wales would not consider those working as Careers Information and Advice Workers to deliver Careers Guidance. [1]

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110414152025/http://www.lluk.org/documents/Career_Guidance_Occupational_Map_-_FINAL_Aug_09.pdf

ANNEX B

LLUK published four example role profiles that appear to be relevant to the work of the Group:

1. Job role: CAREERS ADVISER

(Personal Adviser, Careers Coach, Adult Careers Adviser, Advice and Guidance Worker,

Career and Progression Adviser, Careers Consultant, Careers Guidance Adviser, Employment-

Skills Adviser)

In which lifelong learning sub-sectors would you find this role?

  • Further education
  • Work based learning
  • Career Guidance
  • Higher education
  • Libraries, archive and information services
  • Community Learning and Development
  • Other

In which part of the Career Development sector would you find this role?

  • Employability support
  • Educational Advice and Guidance
  • Career advice and guidance
  • Other

What type of role is this?

  • Professional
  • Para-professional
  • Other

Description of work

Those providing support to individuals at any stage of their life with regard to career management (this can include young people planning their career, unemployed individuals seeking to enter employment or learning, adults interested in up-skilling or changing career direction, those facing redundancy, etc). They support individuals and groups in developing effective career management skills and overcome barriers to employment or learning (this can include voluntary activity). Within further and higher education, this role seeks to deliver an impartial careers information, advice and guidance service primarily for university students and graduates.

Enhancing the employability and career management skills of individuals may be achieved in part through designing and delivering aspects of the curriculum.

In the private sector outplacement and career consultancy support is provided. This may include psychometric testing and access to other charged services. This role may work with individuals to deliver an impartial careers information, advice and guidance service. This career adviser role assists the individual with identifying, presenting and actual needs by use of various techniques (for e.g. probing and challenging, diagnostic tools).

The Careers Adviser will empower the individual to plan a course of action to meet their needs, helping them to explore and develop their decision-making skills. The aim of this activity is increased and appropriate participation in education, training and employment. This can include working with specific client groups, for example clients with learning disabilities or ex-offenders.

Within some contexts there will be overlap between Careers Adviser and other similar roles.

Typical work tasks

  • Assessing (using various tools and techniques) individuals' abilities, interests and achievements
  • Helping individuals to identify their needs by understanding their story
  • Assisting individuals to identify short and/or long term goals
  • Assisting individuals to access quality assured educational, occupational and labour market information and interpret it in relation to themselves
  • Assisting individuals in making realistic and suitable choices
  • Helping individuals to develop effective ongoing career management skills
  • Negotiating with schools, colleges and other agencies
  • Delivering career-related learning
  • Working with institutions to develop and promote career related learning
  • Providing resources for others to use

All the above can be delivered to individuals or in group settings

  • Adhering to safeguarding principles and policies
  • Developing networks and supporting/ influencing partners, e.g. employers, colleges, universities, training providers and other agencies
  • Advocating on behalf of individuals with partner organisations
  • Developing Action Plans with individuals and supporting them to implement their personal action plan
  • Building and managing appropriate resources
  • Writing reports, record keeping and other administrative tasks
  • Contributing to service design, evaluation and review
  • Keeping up to date with occupational and labour market information, developments in education, training and industry and related public policy
  • Engaging in continuous professional development
  • Mentoring

Typical competencies (knowledge/skills/attitude)

  • Ability to motivate and inspire
  • Ability to persuade
  • Ability to challenge
  • Maintain confidentiality
  • Mentoring skills
  • Attention to detail
  • Ability to assess (e.g. diagnosing and summarising priority needs)
  • Excellent record keeping ability
  • Effective communication (listening and questioning) skills, including e-guidance skills
  • Presentation skills
  • Adept at building and maintaining relationships with a wide range of people, networking
  • Ability to research information and explain it clearly
  • IT literate
  • Administrative and report writing skills
  • Organisational and time-management skills, including ability to meet targets
  • Confidence in group situations
  • Ability to influence
  • Ability to refer
  • Ability to negotiate
  • Knowledge of other agencies
  • Knowledge of labour and learning market and recruitment

Qualities

  • Non-judgemental
  • Empathy
  • Confidence
  • Analytical
  • Observant
  • Committed to equal opportunities
  • Adaptable
  • Professional

Experience

Prior experience within the field is considered an asset.

Entry qualifications

Entry qualifications vary depending upon the policy and institutional arrangements in each country and the organisational requirements of the particular employer. Whilst there is a common professional status (explained below) entry can occur at different levels with different entry requirements. For professional Career Guidance posts a postgraduate Qualification in Career Guidance (QCG) or Qualification in Career Guidance & Development (QCGD) in Scotland is usually required. "Trainees" are also recruited without a postgraduate qualification to train on-the-job and would normally be graduates.

Professional qualifications

Professional training - Either a QCG/QCGD plus a probationary year or a S/NVQ Level 4 in Advice and Guidance or a QCF Level 6 Diploma in Career Guidance & Development On-the-job accredited training would usually be the S/NVQ Level 3 in Advice & Guidance or QCF Level 4 Diploma in Careers Information & Advice.

Careers advisers in higher education are encouraged to enhance and extend their professional competence. A formal route for achieving and accrediting this can be through modules of or courses recognised by the AGCAS. These are the Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma and MA Career Education, Information and Guidance in HE (CEIGHE).

Career opportunities

This role allows for the development of transferable skills, therefore there are many career opportunities both within and outside the sector area.

Movement from this role may be either lateral ('sideways') or vertical ('progression'), depending on the interest and ambition of the individual. For example, some may choose to become technical specialists within their respective area, may develop into various management positions, or move out of the sector into alternative roles that use the transferable skills of the individual.

Potential opportunities for careers advisers could include sideways development into a specialist 'expert' role, or progression to a team leader, managerial, or even Head of Service role

UK and global dimension

In the context of the Career Guidance sector, globalisation can be viewed as a multifaceted driver of skills demand.

Firstly, when considered in the context of the internationalisation of business, international competition and related variations in industry performance (i.e. in an economic sense) - globalisation acts to influence the success or decline of individual sectors, national economic success, and employment rates. As such, it indirectly influences the level and nature of demand for Career Guidance relating to specific industries and occupations.

Secondly, increased technological developments have allowed for increased flows of information and communications on a global scale enabling communication of Career Guidance information between practitioners around the world. As such a 'community of practice' has emerged amongst Career Guidance practitioners, notably within the past 10-15 years, which plays a role in guiding skills requirements. The global-scale sharing, discussion and debate of best practice, research findings, organisational function and policy approach has been largely enabled by technological developments.

The influence of globalisation upon the UK's Career Guidance sector has boosted the influence of technological development as a driver of skills, in the sense that a global 'community of practice' in generating best practice amongst Career Guidance practitioners is made possible through facilitating technological infrastructure. Furthermore, technology is greatly impacting on the Careers Guidance sector in that new players are entering the careers support market due to low entry cost, rapid development and high market penetration which can be achieved through ICT. Further, existing organisations are applying emergent technologies to increase efficiency in terms of 'cost per user' and in general increasing the number of users. This usage varies, whereas in some cases users are being supported in largely self-managed contexts to find the information they need via web-based resources; in others the internet and email are being used to communicate with more users than would otherwise be the case. Emergent technologies are therefore being used to support and extend existing ways of delivering career support.

Future trends

In the present context of economic restructuring, it can be anticipated that demand for career support is likely to increase, but within the context of diminishing resources. Although not the intent to replace face-to-face services, ICT is seen as a way to increase take-up and enhancement of career support services.

Therefore there will be a need to ensure that practitioners are able to support, facilitate and guide individuals through their use of relevant technologies, as well as ensure that their own skills sets are aligned with technological trends.

Ref: CG/03 2011/01

2. Job role: Employability Adviser

(Personal Adviser, Employment Coach, Employment-Skills Adviser, Employability Tutor,

Employment and Skills Adviser, Careers Assistant)

In which lifelong learning sub-sectors would you find this role?

  • Further education
  • Work based learning
  • Career Guidance
  • Higher education
  • Libraries, archive and information services
  • Community Learning and Development
  • Other

In which part of the Career Development sector would you find this role?

  • Employability support
  • Educational Advice and Guidance
  • Career advice and guidance
  • Other

What type of role is this?

  • Professional
  • Para-professional
  • Other

Description of work

The ultimate goal of the Employability Adviser (Personal Adviser) is getting people into work. They will focus on getting individuals into the workforce by developing confidence and employability skills, helping individuals to develop 'softer' skills to secure and retain employment. This may include practical training such as CV writing. They may also provide support to an individual as they progress into employment, assisting and monitoring the progress of that individual.

This role seeks to identify barriers to employment and assist clients in moving closer to the labour market or returning to work. Individuals would be advised on benefit entitlement, and provided with information and support in pursuing employment and the multiple programmes available.

Typical competencies (knowledge/skills/attitude)

  • Empathy and commitment to working with individuals to help them find employment, ability to demonstrate respect and self-awareness
  • Interpersonal/ communication skills
  • Technical, negotiation and influencing skills
  • Attention to detail
  • Excellent administrative and written skills
  • Proficient computer skills
  • Basic skills and knowledge needed to 'diagnose' specialist needs, such as homelessness, mental health problems, etc.
  • Ability to develop excellent working relationships and to market and promote services
  • Job-brokering skills
  • Referral skills
  • Organisational and planning skills
  • Knowledge of learning opportunities
  • Knowledge of benefits/entitlements
  • Knowledge of local labour market information, training providers, agencies providing specialist support
  • Commercial awareness and acumen
  • Managing group dynamics
  • Diagnostic skills

The six key areas of activity that are undertaken are:

  • Employer liaison: working with employers to secure vacancies and build relationships
  • Job placing: working with individuals and/or employers to place individuals into work
  • Specialist support: working with specific claimant groups, such as lone parents, disabled, older people or younger people
  • Outreach: work in the community to encourage referrals
  • Aftercare: focus on ensuring individuals stay in work, liaising with employers and individuals to monitor progress
  • Training and skills: provide specific support related to learning or career development.

Typical work tasks

  • Providing tailored advice related to career aspirations
  • Taking a holistic approach to advising on the full range of an individual's needs
  • Conducting individual, diagnostic interviews with clients to assess needs.
  • Improving specific employability skills (for e.g. CV writing and interviewing skills)
  • Encouraging self-confidence and the maintaining of a positive stance towards work
  • Building and maintaining effective relationships with individuals and colleagues/ external resources
  • Working with individuals to explore options for work-focused activity
  • Assisting individual in developing job retention skills
  • Maintaining manual records/contact database
  • Producing reports, including statistical returns for management purposes
  • Undertake job searches and refer individuals to suitable vacancies
  • Working to pre-set targets and goals
  • Keeping up-to-date with labour market information
  • Adhering to safeguarding principles and policies.
  • Knowledge and understanding of employability skills and how individuals can develop and demonstrate them.

Qualities

  • Analytical
  • Observant
  • Impartial
  • Maintain confidentiality
  • Non-judgemental
  • Adaptable
  • High energy levels, proactive nature
  • Solution-focused
  • Team-oriented
  • Approachable
  • Empathetic
  • Patient and tolerant
  • Enthusiastic
  • Innovative
  • Drive/ personal desire
  • Resilient
  • Committed to equal opportunities
  • Commitment to continuing professional development.

Experience

Comparable experience is an asset in gaining entry to this industry; however levels of experience may vary per organisation. For example, having experience of working with and understanding the needs of young people and unemployed adults, as well as the ability to research and provide information may prove beneficial.

Entry qualifications

Currently, there are no minimum or mandatory qualifications requirements for entry into this industry; therefore many advisers will not hold industry-specific qualifications. Individuals coming into the industry possess a wide range of experience and backgrounds. In Scotland, individuals can have relevant experience of working with the public. Within some organisations in Wales, individuals are required to possess or work towards the S/NVQ Level 3 in Advice & Guidance or QCF Level 4 Diploma in Careers Information & Advice.

Professional qualifications

Many advisers within employability work towards the S/NVQ Level 3 in Advice & Guidance or QCF Level 4 Diploma in Careers Information & Advice; or S/NVQ Level 4 in Advice and Guidance or a QCF Level 6 Diploma in Career Guidance & Development (or equivalent). However this qualification is not felt to be appropriate to the more specialised requirements of the workforce.

Career opportunities

This role allows for the development of transferable skills, therefore there are many career opportunities both within and outside the sector area. Movement from this role may be either lateral ('sideways') or vertical ('progression'), depending on the interest and ambition of the individual. For example, some may choose to become technical specialists within their respective area, may develop into various management positions, or move out of the sector into alternative roles that use the transferable skills of the individual.

Potential opportunities for employability advisers could include sideways development into a specialist 'expert' role, or progression to a careers adviser/ key worker, team leader, managerial, or even Head of Service role.

UK and global dimension Future trends

Within the UK, the qualification and/or experience requirements vary based on organisational need, contractual obligations and other possible factors.

There is a current initiative to professionalise the welfare to work industry. The intent is to provide an industry framework that will provide a quality assured structure that will support the development of individuals in this role. By doing so, this will allow these advisers to work at a confident and competent level and provide distinctive pathways for development.

Ref: CG/03 2011/02

3. Job role: First Contact Adviser

(Careers Receptionist/Clerical, Careers Support)

In which lifelong learning sub-sectors would you find this role?

  • Further education
  • Work based learning
  • Career Guidance
  • Higher education
  • Libraries, archive and information services
  • Community Learning and Development
  • Other

In which part of the Career Development sector would you find this role?

  • Employability support
  • Educational Advice and Guidance
  • Career advice and guidance
  • Other

What type of role is this?

  • Professional
  • Para-professional
  • Other
  • Foundation

Description of work

The job holder provides the first point of contact for enquirers to the careers development or associated service. Depending on the context this may be done over the telephone, face to face or by electronic media.

Important aspects of the work are likely to include:

· providing a welcoming point of initial contact to the service

· identifying the reason for the enquiry and referring it to other colleagues or agencies where appropriate

· providing appropriate information

· recording individual and maintaining service information

In some settings there may be a requirement to maintain careers and related information resources.The aim of this activity is primarily to deal with enquiries effectively and efficiently.

Typical competencies (knowledge/skills/attitude)

  • Ability to handle multiple enquiries
  • Ability to refer
  • Maintain confidentiality
  • Excellent customer service skills
  • Excellent record keeping ability
  • Effective communication (listening and questioning) skills
  • Adept at building and maintaining relationships with a wide range of people
  • Knowledge of the service and associated agencies
  • The ability to identify appropriate information and explain it clearly
  • IT literate
  • Administrative and data recording skills
  • Organisational and time-management skills, including ability to meet targets
  • Able to work as part of a team

Qualities

  • Non-judgemental and empathetic
  • Enthusiastic and welcoming
  • Confident
  • Committed to equal opportunities
  • Committed to providing a quality service
  • Adaptable

Experience

Some experience of providing information in a careers related environment may be required for full, rather than trainee, posts. Evidence of understanding the needs of particular groups may be required.

Typical work tasks

  • Assessing the reasons for enquiries
  • Identifying how best these enquires can be answered
  • Providing relevant information to enquirers
  • Referring enquirers to colleagues and other agencies where appropriate
  • Signposting enquirers to other agencies where appropriate
  • Supporting networks with partners
  • Building and managing appropriate resources
  • Maintaining records of enquiries, individuals and staff
  • Contributing to service design, evaluation and review
  • Keeping up to date with relevant information, developments in appropriate agencies and
  • related public policy
  • Engaging in continuous professional development
  • Record keeping and other administrative tasks
  • Adhering to safeguarding principles and policies.

Entry qualifications

Precise qualification requirements may vary between employers and the precise job role. Entry can usually be with "A" levels/ SQA Highers or equivalent. Entry requirements may also include a level 2 S/NVQ or equivalent qualification however some roles require the individual to 'work towards' a qualification, hence allowing entry without prior qualification. Some roles require an S/NVQ Level 3 in Advice & Guidance or QCF Level 4 Diploma in Careers Information & Advice upon entry.

Some employers offer trainee positions where an important requirement will be to demonstrate the capacity to achieve this level of qualification.

Professional qualifications

S/NVQ level 2 (possibly in Customer Service) or equivalent. However many posts require the individual to be willing to 'work towards' the S/NVQ Level 3 in Advice & Guidance or QCF Level 4 Diploma in Careers Information & Advice. Some posts may require completion of the Level 3 Award for Supporting Clients to Overcome Barriers to Learning and Work.

Career opportunities

This role allows for the development of transferable skills, therefore there are many career opportunities both within and outside the sector area.

Movement from this role may be either lateral ('sideways') or vertical ('progression'), depending on the interest and ambition of the individual. For example, some may choose to become technical specialists within their respective area, may develop into various management positions, or move out of the sector into alternative roles that use the transferable skills of the individual.

Potential opportunities for first contact advisers could include development into an Employability Adviser or Careers Assistant, or progression to a careers adviser, team leader, managerial, or even Head of Service role.

UK and global dimension Future trends

Technology is greatly impacting on the Careers Guidance sector. New players are entering the careers support market due to low entry cost, rapid development and high market penetration which can be achieved through ICT.

Furthermore, existing organisations are applying ICT to increase efficiency in terms of 'cost per user' and in general increasing the number of users. This usage varies, whereas in some cases users are being supported in largely self-managed contexts to find the information they need via web-based resources; in others the internet and email are being used to communicate with more users than would otherwise be the case. Emergent technologies are therefore being used to support and extend existing ways of delivering career support.

Utilisation of phone services is currently occurring; allowing allocation to advisers with minimal dead time and having the advantage of using call-centre management techniques to quality assure provision.

In the present context of economic restructuring, it can be anticipated that demand for career support is likely to increase, but within the context of diminishing resources.

Although not the intent to replace face-to-face services, ICT is seen as a way to increase take-up and enhancement of career support services.

Therefore there will be a need to ensure that practitioners are able to support, facilitate and guide individuals through their use of relevant technologies, as well as ensure that their own skills sets are aligned with technological trends.

Ref: CG/03 2011/03

4. Job role: Key Worker

(Intensive Support Personal Adviser, Youth Gateway Personal Adviser, Peer Adviser)

In which lifelong learning sub-sectors would you find this role?

  • Further education
  • Work based learning
  • Career Guidance
  • Higher education
  • Libraries, archive and information services
  • Community Learning and Development
  • Other

In which part of the Career Development sector would you find this role?

  • Employability support
  • Educational Advice and Guidance
  • Career advice and guidance
  • Other

What type of role is this?

  • Professional
  • Para-professional
  • Other

Description of work

These jobs typically involve working with individuals who are farthest from the labour market and face significant barriers in being able to access the opportunities for education, training and employment that would otherwise be available. General skills in diagnosing individual need, providing information, supporting the development of career management skills and offering careers advice and guidance will be appropriate but need to be tailored to the context of these individuals. This may place a particular emphasis on:

· safeguarding and welfare issues

· being able to engage with and effectively support individuals with extensive needs

· providing more intensive, personal support and managing a caseload of such individuals

· helping to develop bespoke support packages in collaboration with other agencies

· strong networking skills required.

Typical competencies (knowledge/skills/attitude)

  • Ability to motivate and inspire
  • Ability to engage and empathise with individuals
  • Ability to refer
  • Ability to take initiative
  • Ability to set and hold boundaries
  • Ability to challenge
  • Attention to detail
  • Maintain confidentiality
  • Excellent record keeping ability
  • Effective communication (listening and questioning) skills
  • Adept at building and maintaining relationships with a wide range of people

A unique entry pathway into this role is by way of the 'Peer Adviser'. These paraprofessionals are trained to work with people facing disadvantage in order to assist with a range of issues including employment, training, benefits and housing. By its nature, these advisers will have experienced the situations within which they are assisting others.

The aim of this activity is to increase the self-confidence, aspirations and capacity of clients to enable them to respond to education, training or employment opportunities and effectively access general support services.

Typical work tasks

  • Assessing (using various tools and techniques) individuals' abilities, interests and achievements
  • Adhering to safeguarding principles and policies
  • Helping individuals to identify their needs
  • Assisting individuals to identify short and/or long term goals
  • Assisting individuals to access appropriate information and interpret it in relation to themselves
  • Assisting individuals in making realistic and suitable choices
  • Helping individuals to develop effective personal development skills
  • Delivering career-related learning
  • Work with institutions to promote career related learning.

(All the above can be delivered to individuals or in group settings)

  • Developing networks and supporting/ influencing partners, eg other agencies, education
  • and training providers and employers
  • Advocating on behalf of individuals with partner organisations
  • Signposting and referring
  • Developing Action Plans with individuals and supporting them to implement their personal action plan
  • Building and managing appropriate resources
  • Contributing to service design, evaluation, review and improvement
  • Keeping up to date with relevant information, developments in appropriate agencies and related public policy
  • Engaging in continuous professional development
  • Writing reports, record keeping and other administrative tasks
  • Mentoring.
  • Knowledge of other agencies
  • Effective networking and negotiating skill
  • The ability to research information and explain it clearly
  • IT literate
  • Administrative and report writing skills
  • Organisational and time-management skills, including ability to meet targets
  • Confidence in group situations
  • Ability to influence
  • Negotiation/persuasion skills
  • Ability to work as a team
  • Good literacy skills or ability to gain with support
  • Ability to understand legislation and documentation.

Qualities

  • Non-judgemental
  • Interest in helping others
  • Empathy
  • Confidence
  • Interest in 'leading by example'
  • Analytical/ Diagnostic
  • Observant
  • Organised
  • Methodical
  • Positive mentality
  • Committed to equal opportunities.

Experience

Particular emphasis is likely to be placed on experience of, and demonstration of capability to, work with disadvantaged, disaffected and vulnerable individuals.

As a Peer Adviser, the individual must have experienced the same or similar disadvantage to the population they work with and have made tangible progress towards changing their own lives. As a 'peer' the adviser must be able to relate experientially with the individual but with sufficient confidence in their own development.

Entry qualifications

Entry qualifications vary depending upon the policy and institutional arrangements in each country and the organisational requirements of the particular employer. Whilst there is a common professional status (explained below) entry can occur at different levels with different entry requirements.

Many employers expect degree level/ S/NVQ in Advice and Guidance or a QCF Level 6 Diploma in Career Guidance & Development. Those in youth work or social care, as well as career guidance, could be appropriate.

Other employers set a minimum qualification requirement of S/NVQ Level 3 in Advice & Guidance or QCF Level 4 Diploma in Careers Information & Advice or equivalent. It is likely that in these jobs the post holder would be expected to achieve the full professional qualifications whilst employed.

As a Peer Adviser, the individual must have experienced the same circumstances of the potential client. Identified potential advisers will be screened for placement, in order to progress within a work-based learning Advice and Guidance qualification.

Professional qualifications

Degree, S/NVQ Level 4 in Advice and Guidance or a QCF Level 6 Diploma in Career Guidance & Development or equivalent and a post-graduate or professional qualification in an appropriate subject such as social care, youth work or career guidance.

At the paraprofessional level, completion of the S/NVQ Level 3 in Advice & Guidance or QCF Level 4 Diploma in Careers Information & Advice is required.

Career opportunities

This role allows for the development of transferable skills, therefore there are many career opportunities both within and outside the sector area. Movement from this role may be either lateral ('sideways') or vertical ('progression'), depending on the interest and ambition of the individual. For example, some may choose to become technical specialists within their respective area, may develop into various management positions, or move out of the sector into alternative roles that use the transferable skills of the individual.

Potential opportunities for key workers could include sideways development into a specialist 'expert' role, or progression to a team leader, managerial, or even Head of Service role.

UK and global dimension Future trends

In the context of the Career Guidance occupation, globalisation can be viewed as a multifaceted driver of skills demand. This may make a direct contribution to the barriers faced by individuals by disrupting traditional patterns of employment and generating areas of economic deprivation.

Firstly, when considered in the context of the internationalisation of business, international competition and related variations in industry performance (i.e. in an economic sense) - globalisation acts to influence the success or decline of individual sectors, national economic success, and employment rates. As such, it indirectly influences the level and nature of demand for support in different localities as a result of their differential industrial impact.

Secondly, globalisation has been closely linked to the development and increasing influence of information and communication technologies. The associated 'digital divide' may adversely affect the prospects of individuals in economically deprived areas both directly (e.g. access to high speed broadband) and via the social corollaries of this within their communities.

In the present context of economic restructuring, it can be anticipated that demand for career support is likely to increase, but within the context of diminishing resources. Although not the intent to replace face-to-face services, emergent technologies are seen as a way to increase take-up and enhancement of career support services. Therefore there will be a need to ensure that practitioners are able to support, facilitate and guide individuals through their use of relevant technologies, as well as ensure that their own skills sets align with technological trends. However, it is necessary to consider the changing profile of the client base and this is likely to vary between localities. It is important to consider the impact of emergent technologies on economically deprived populations. As well as redefining future employment opportunities there is also the possibility that the UK will follow the US in experiencing a significant expansion in self-employment. In part this may be driven by 'necessity entrepreneurship' in which people excluded from existing employment opportunities seek to make a living through working on their own account.

Ref: CG/03 2011/04

JOB DESCRIPTION AND PERSON SPECIFICATION FOR AN EDUCATION GUIDANCE ADVISER

Job Description

Reporting To: Senior Education Guidance Adviser

Dimensions:

Provides guidance and support to all potential and on-going part-time students on flexible programmes of study and across Student Link student support activities.

There are no budgetary or supervisory responsibilities.

Key Result Areas:

  • To provide guidance and advice to students across Student Link support and guidance areas
  • To provide pre-entry, on-going and exit guidance and personal tutor support to part time LLA students studying across four campuses or by distance learning.
  • To ensure that part time students follow suitable programmes of study and receive effective assistance during their Higher Education experience
  • To actively participate in widening participation activities and student recruitment processes through visits to, and liaison with, Schools, Further Education establishments, companies and community organisations by offering advice and guidance on the transition to Higher Education and promoting the University
  • To establish cross campus links with Academic Schools and other services to co-ordinate and ensure appropriate academic support for part-time students and to address progression and retention issues within the student population
  • To actively participate in Subject Panels and programme award boards through co-ordination and/ or moderation of modules providing information and guidance on relevant issues in order to aid the decision-making process.
  • To undertake teaching and research, including evaluating documentation in relation to Student Link activities
  • Represent the Student Link on University and external Committees.
  • To participate and report to the Lifelong Learning SDG with regard to LLA modules and to provide feedback on the management of modules including the student experience.

Planning and Organising:

The Academy forms part of the Student Link and is the academic and administrative base for the University's part-time provision. Programmes are delivered over four campuses, by distance learning, in FE colleges and other venues.

The Academy also raises awareness of and aspirations to Higher Education in the West of Scotland through liaison with primary schools, secondary schools and other relevant organisations throughout Scotland particularly in areas where participation rates are low.

An annual plan is agreed with the Senior Educational Guidance Adviser and this is monitored regularly. The role is mainly independent with regard to planning work on a daily basis, managing the workload and keeping to agreed targets within the academic context.

Working Relationships:

Internal

  • Frequent regular contact with potential and current students providing advice, guidance and support.
  • Ongoing contact with colleagues and team members through formal and informal meetings across the Student Link.
  • Staff liaison at all levels through module co-ordination and committees.
  • Negotiation with Schools on admissions criteria for part-time students, forward and progressive planning and delivery of modules.

External

  • Contact with prospective students on campus, in FE Colleges, in public and private sector companies and organisations and within the community setting.
  • Liaison with Employers and other stakeholders.
  • Regular contact with external educational bodies (e.g. SCQF, SFC, SQA, SWAP, Schools, FE Colleges and HEIs).

Qualifications, Experience, Skills & Knowledge required:

Qualifications

Essential

  • Educated to Degree level or equivalent

Desirable

  • A Guidance Qualification

Experience

Essential

  • Previous experience of working in a guidance role
  • Experience of writing reports and giving presentations
  • Experience of motivating and persuading individuals with differing priorities

Desirable

  • Experience of adult or HE guidance and widening participation
  • Academic teaching experience

Skills / Knowledge / Understanding

Essential

  • Well developed oral and written communication skills
  • Must be able to prioritise workload and work on own initiative
  • Ability to use a range of Microsoft packages

Desirable

  • Familiarity with the principles of RPL
  • Evidence of recent or continuing research activity

Person Specification

Education/Qualifications/Training:Essential
  • Educated to Degree level or equivalent

Desirable

  • A Guidance qualification

Experience:

Essential

  • Previous experience of working in a guidance role
  • Experience of writing reports and giving presentations
  • Experience of motivating and persuading individuals with differing priorities

Desirable

  • Experience of adult or HE guidance and widening participation
  • Academic teaching experience
Skills/Knowledge/Understanding:

Essential

  • Must be able to prioritise workload and work on own initiative
  • Ability to use a range of Microsoft packages

Desirable

  • Familiarity with the principles of RPL
  • Evidence of recent or continuing research activity

Personal Attributes:

Essential

  • Must have a professional and confident manner and the ability to work as part of a team as well as working independently
  • Ability to work under pressure and meet tight deadlines
  • Must be flexible and be willing to work outside of normal working hours, as required
  • Willing to travel as remit covers four campuses and visits to other organisations
  • Must have excellent organisational skills and be able to influence others
  • Must have enthusiasm and commitment