We have a new website go to gov.scot

Review of The Climate Challenge Fund

DescriptionThe Review of the Climate Challenge Fund has investigated in depth the impacts of 21 community projects across Scotland looking to reduce carbon emissions and explored how they have been successful. This report plus annexes gives a full account of the review process and findings.
ISBN978 1 780452654
Official Print Publication DateJune 2011
Website Publication DateJune 17, 2011

Listen

Brook Lyndhurst and Ecometrica

ISBN 978 1 78045 265 4 (Web only publication)
ISSN 0950 2254
DPPAS 11792

This document is also available in pdf format (1.2mb)

This report is accompanied by an appendices report

This report is accompanied by a research findings

CONTENTS

1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

2 INTRODUCTION
2.1 Scope of the CCF review
2.2 Methodology
2.3 Data quality and limitations
2.4 Report Structure

3 IMPACTS OF CCF PROJECTS
3.1 Overview
3.2 Introduction
3.3 Key achievements
3.4 Changes in participants' attitudes to climate change and environmental issues
3.5 Changes in participants' behaviours
3.6 Spillover and rebound effects
3.7 What role did projects play in changing behaviours?
3.8 Carbon emission reductions
3.9 Additional impacts

4 MOTIVATIONS, BARRIERS AND SUCCESS FACTORS
4.1 Overview
4.2 Introduction
4.3 Energy
4.4 Food
4.5 Transport
4.6 Waste
4.7 Multi-strand behaviour change approaches
4.8 School projects

5 CROSS-CUTTING SUCCESS FACTORS
5.1 Overview
5.2 Introduction
5.3 Project function
5.4 Audience
5.5 Engagement processes
5.6 Messaging and hooks
5.7 Profile and trust

6 MONITORING AND EVALUATION
6.1 Overview
6.2 Introduction
6.3 Discussion

7 POTENTIAL FOR SCALING AND DIFFUSION OF CCF PROJECT APPROACHES
7.1 Overview
7.2 Introduction
7.3 Potential for self-funding
7.4 Potential for scaling up
7.5 Potential for replication

8 ROLE OF COMMUNITIES
8.2 Introduction

9 CONCLUSIONS
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Outcomes from the CCF
9.3 Implications for community climate and behaviour change projects
9.4 Implications for fund managers
9.5 Implications for policy

The views expressed in this report are those of the researcher and
do not necessarily represent those of the Department or Scottish Ministers.

This report is available on the Scottish Government Social Research website only
www.scotland.gov.uk/socialresearch.