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Scottish Budget: Draft Budget 2010-11

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EDUCATION & LIFELONG LEARNING

Portfolio Responsibilities

The Education and Lifelong Learning portfolio is responsible for government policy related to improving outcomes for children, young people and users of social care, all aspects of school education and national qualifications and further and higher education, community and adult learning and development, skills and training. The portfolio contributes substantively to all our Strategic Objectives and is the principal driver of our 'Smarter' Strategic Objective.

Underpinning the Government's Economic Strategy and Purpose, the portfolio contributes to the Government's Productivity, Participation, Cohesion and Solidarity purpose targets and our policies and resources are aligned to deliver the Smarter and Wealthier and Fairer strategic objectives and in particular the following National Outcomes:

  • We realise our full economic potential with more and better employment opportunities for our people. (National Outcome 2)
  • We are better educated, more skilled and more successful, renowned for our research and innovation. (National Outcome 3)
  • Our young people are successful learners, confident individuals, effective contributors and responsible citizens. (National Outcome 4)
  • Our children have the best start in life and are ready to succeed. (National Outcome 5)
  • We have improved the life chances for children, young people and families at risk. (National Outcome 8)

The Economic Strategy's Purpose targets provide a challenging and ambitious set of benchmarks for sustainable economic growth in Scotland. The Education and Lifelong Learning portfolio offers a significant contribution to the purpose targets:

We are improving Scotland's productivity and competitiveness through the Skills Strategy.

We are supporting Scotland's labour market participation through targeted activity to address both adult and youth unemployment.

We are ensuring this growth is sustainable, supports a cohesive society, and builds solidarity across all parts of Scotland through our focus on early years, employability and Curriculum for Excellence.

The portfolio funds further and higher education through the Scottish Further and Higher Education Funding Council and the Student Awards Agency for Scotland. It also funds the Scottish Government's national skills agency, Skills Development Scotland. It is responsible for policy relating to all aspects of lifelong learning, including science, skills, community and adult learning, and literacy and numeracy.

Our responsibility for the provision of school education and community learning and development is shared with local authorities, individual schools and Community Planning Partnerships. We work with our national delivery partners through the provision of advice, guidance and support on the national elements of school education policy and the national qualifications as well as quality assurance through national inspection.

Responsibility for the provision of children's services and social care is shared, both with other portfolios and with a range of service providers such as local authorities, health boards and the voluntary and independent sectors. We support workforce development and broader improvement in social services and the development of a range of policies and services for children and young people, particularly the most vulnerable, and provide quality assurance through inspection, by the Social Work Inspection Agency ( SWIA) and national standards.

We fund the Scottish Children's Reporter Administration ( SCRA) which is at the centre of the Children's Hearings System, providing a critical service for children most at risk; making decisions on referrals to Children's Hearings, supporting panel members and enabling children and families to participate in Hearings. We also support the Scottish Social Services Council ( SSSC), responsible for registering people who work in social services and regulating their education and training; working towards delivering a competent, confident and valued social service workforce.

In addition, Disclosure Scotland, an Agency since April 2009, supports the protection of children and young people through the provision of an accurate and responsive disclosure service.

Summary of Key Spending Priorities

Some specific examples of the activity supported by the Education & Lifelong Learning Portfolio Budget are described below:

  • The Early Years Framework sets out the vision for a 10 year programme of transformational change in Scotland to give all our children the best start in life, and to tackle, at the earliest possible point, the disadvantage and adversity that some children face. The principles and approaches already set out in Getting it Right for Every Child are central to the delivery of these changes. We are investing £103.8m to help ensure that all children and young people have the best start in life and promote early intervention to protect vulnerable children and families at risk and ensuring the protection of vulnerable groups through the completion of the implementation of the Protecting Vulnerable Groups Scheme;
  • The implementation of Curriculum for Excellence will be taken forward with key national delivery partners, supported by investment of £132.9m, improving standards in teaching and learning to ensure that Scotland's education system can become internationally recognised for its excellence and one of the best performing in the world. This includes the funding of Learning & Teaching Scotland and Scottish Qualifications Authority;
  • Funding of £198.2m for Skills Development Scotland which supports individuals and businesses, particularly those affected by the economic downturn;
  • Recognising the central role of further and higher education in supporting our overall Purpose and Strategic Objectives, we are investing £1,777m in our colleges and universities.

Contribution to Economic Recovery

The Education and Lifelong Learning portfolio has a key contribution to make to the Scottish Government's central Purpose of creating a more successful country through increasing sustainable economic growth and to the economic recovery programme which builds on the Purpose by providing a framework for action now that Scotland is in recession. Our focus is on strengthening education and skills through ScotAction - an integrated package of skills training to help individuals and businesses through the recession.

Carbon Impact

Expenditure in the education portfolio seeks to reduce emissions principally through measures intended to influence behaviour. Learning and Teaching Scotland promote Sustainable Development Education ( SDE) as a cross-cutting theme embedded within Curriculum for Excellence with a dedicated SDE development officer driving through behavioural change in teaching. In addition, sustainable development will be a key theme in a number of the new National Qualifications. The Government also funds 'Keep Scotland Beautiful' to manage and develop the Eco Schools Scotland Programme, one of the most successful in the world with 96% of schools signed-up, which promotes pupil awareness and activism in environmental issues including climate change. We also actively encourage authorities to reduce emissions through their management of the school estate.

The Scottish Further and Higher Education Funding Council ( SFHEFC) and Skills Development Scotland ( SDS) have both committed in their Corporate Plans to reducing their carbon impact. SFHEFC is developing sustainable use of resources in its capital investment programme and supporting investment in research and teaching programmes that develop and promote sustainability and the renewable energy programme. SDS is improving sustainable business practices including estates and promoting economic growth and social cohesion.

Equalities

The policy of the Education & Lifelong Learning portfolio supports the Smarter and Wealthier and Fairer strategic objectives:

SMARTER: Expanding opportunities for all in Scotland to succeed from nurture through to life long learning, providing a good foundation to higher and more widely shared achievements.

Implicit in this objective is an ambition that all children, young people and learners in Scotland have equality of opportunity.

WEALTHIER & FAIRER: Enable businesses and people to increase their wealth and more people to share fairly in that wealth.

The economic downturn has strengthened our commitment to making Scotland a wealthier and fairer nation. Making the best use of the skills of all our people is of fundamental importance in driving the high skill, high productivity workplace that we seek. In terms of our own organisation, we encourage and support flexible working patterns in the Directorates within the ELL portfolio.

In Children, Young People & Social Care Directorate, the SMARTER objective means our children have the best start in life and we have improved the life chances for children, young people and families at risk. We will work with national delivery partners to achieve this by promoting equality, diversity and inclusion, improving outcomes for looked after children and families requiring support, and in promoting high quality childcare for all.

Too many young people still leave school with no positive destination. In Schools Directorate the SMARTER objective means all our young people are successful learners, confident individuals, effective contributors and responsible citizens. We will work with national delivery partners to achieve this by promoting equality, diversity and inclusion in learning and teaching, achievement and attainment and by equipping our young people with the skills they need.

In Lifelong Learning Directorate, the SMARTER objective means we are better educated, more skilled and more successful, renowned for our research and innovation. Skills for Scotland, our Lifelong Skills Strategy promotes equal access to and participation in, skills and learning for all, it aims to recognise people's different needs, situations and goals and remove the barriers that limit what people can do and can be.

Spending plans for 2010-11 are set out below.

Table 4.01 Detailed spending plans (Level 2)

2009-10

Budget

£m

2010-11

Draft Budget

£m

Schools

135.6

132.9

Children, Young People & Social Care

106.2

103.8

Student Awards Agency for Scotland ( SAAS)

512.7

568.4

Scottish Further and Higher Education Funding Council

1,750.1

1,777.2

Other Lifelong Learning

276.9

269.6

Total

2,781.52,851.9

Student Loans Interest Subsidy to Banks (outside TME)

4.5

4.5

Central Government Grants to Local Authorities19.219.2

Table 4.02 Detailed spending plans (Level 2 real terms) at 2009-10 prices

2009-10

Budget

£m

2010-11

Draft Budget

£m

Schools

135.6

130.9

Children, Young People & Social Care

106.2

102.3

Student Awards Agency for Scotland ( SAAS)

512.7

560.0 1

Scottish Further and Higher Education Funding Council

1,750.1

1,750.9

Other Lifelong Learning

276.9

265.6

Total

2,781.5

2,809.7

Student Loans Interest Subsidy to Banks (outside TME)

4.5

4.4

Central Government Grants to Local Authorities19.218.9

1 This includes £40.3 million reflecting the fourth year of a technical adjustment between SFHEFC and SAAS. These monies are paid to universities in the form of tuition fees.

Budget changes

As a result of the cuts imposed by the Chancellor, the ELL Portfolio spending plans for 2010-11 have been reduced by £49.7m since they were published in the 2009-10 draft budget. In making these changes, we have aimed to protect spend wherever possible on the people-related aspects of economic recovery, notably through Skills Development Scotland and have sought savings through lower than anticipated inflation, improved workforce planning, refocusing spend and more proportionate scrutiny.

We have secured increases to the following budgets: the Skills Development Scotland budget for 2010-11 has been increased by £16m for Modern Apprenticeships taking into account the agreement reached with Parliament on the 2009-10 Scottish Budget. In addition, a further £8.4m has been allocated to the further education resource budget; and £10m of increased capital has been invested in the school estate programme.

Our spending plans for the portfolio therefore include the following changes made to the 2010-11 budget since the publication of the 2009-10 draft budget.

Schools

There has been a £10m increase in capital investment in schools estates.

The schools budget has increased by a further £0.147m transfer from the enterprise and employability of young people budget for Post School Psychological Services graduate training places.

Children Young People & Social Care

£0.9m has been transferred into the budget from the third sector budget to Disclosure Scotland to support the operation of the Central Registered Body in Scotland.

Student Awards Agency for Scotland ( SAAS)

The SAAS budget includes £40.3m reflecting the fourth year of a technical adjustment between the Scottish Further and Higher Education Funding Council and SAAS. These monies are paid to universities in the form of tuition fees.

Scottish Further & Higher Education Funding Council ( SFHEFC)

Reflecting capital funding previously accelerated from 2010-11 across 2008-09 and 2009-10, the higher education capital line will be reduced by £12m and that for further education reduced by £8.5m.

As noted above, £40.3m will be transferred to SAAS for tuition fees.

The budget has increased as follows: £5m has been transferred from the Other Lifelong Learning budget for the Scottish Institute for Cell Signalling; and £8.4m of consequential funding arising from the 2009 UK Budget has been allocated to the further education resource budget.

Other Lifelong Learning

We are separately transferring £3m from EMAs to support Activity and Learning Agreement pilots.

The Skills Development Scotland budget has been increased by £16m for Modern Apprenticeships, taking account of the agreement reached with Parliament on the 2009-10 Scottish Budget.

£5m has been transferred to SFHEFC for the Scottish Institute for Cell Signalling.

Schools

Table 4.03 More detailed spending plans (Level 3)

2009-10

Budget

£m

2010-11

Draft Budget

£m

Teachers

31.8

22.1

Schools

14.8

20.1

Support for Learning

15.4

15.4

Qualifications, Assessment and Skills

32.5

35.6

Curriculum

25.3

24.1

HM Inspectorate of Education

15.8

15.6

Total

135.6132.9

What the budget does

The majority of expenditure on school aged education in Scotland is funded by local authorities from the budgets outlined in chapter 9. The Schools Directorate budget supports the national elements of policy and related workforce development needs. It also supports the inspection programme of HM Inspectorate of Education and the activities of other public bodies such as Learning and Teaching Scotland and the Scottish Qualifications Authority. Working with national partners in line with the Concordat with local government, we will:

  • support the development of the national elements and local delivery of Curriculum for Excellence by schools and colleges for all learners, including delivery of new qualifications in conjunction with the Scottish Qualifications Authority ( SQA) which meet the needs of 21st Century Scotland and a new assessment framework to support learning and teaching taking full account of issues relating to equality, diversity and inclusion. The Curriculum and the Qualifications, Assessment and Skills budgets reflect that having produced the Experience and Outcomes for Curriculum for Excellence in 2009-10, investment can now focus on the new qualifications.
  • maintain and develop a skilled, supported and flexible teaching profession and support staff, with excellent local and school leadership and a fit-for-purpose school estate;
  • deliver the national elements and support the local delivery of Curriculum for Excellence which will ensure that every learner has the right personal support for their learning, particularly those with additional support needs and those in need of more choices and more chances;
  • deliver a public sector landscape for school education which is robust, efficient and effective as part of our wider work to achieve these goals in all learning environments.

Budget changes

There has been a £10m increase in capital investment in schools estates.

The schools budget has increased by a further £0.147m transfer from the enterprise and employability of young people budget for Post School Pyschological Services graduate training places.

Children, Young People and Social Care

Table 4.04 More detailed spending plans (Level 3)

2009-10

Budget

£m

2010-11

Draft

Budget

£m

Workforce and Capacity

63.5

61.0

Care and Justice

8.9

9.0

Safer Children, Stronger Families

14.6

13.7

Positive Futures

10.9

11.0

Education Analytical Services

3.9

4.2

Social Work Inspection Agency

4.4

4.0

Disclosure Scotland

0.0

0.9

Total

106.2

103.8

What the budget does

The majority of expenditure on children's services in Scotland is funded by local authorities from the budgets outlined in chapter 9.

The Children, Young People and Social Care budget supports our twin ambitions of better, more personalised services to improve outcomes and having a confident competent and valued workforce to deliver this. The budget supports a broad range of activity being taken forward with Community Planning Partners to implement the Early Years Framework and to support earlier, more effective intervention. Getting it Right for Every Child is the programme that shows how agencies across Scotland can work more effectively together better to support children, whether in universal or specialist services.

The largest proportion of the budget supports workforce development in the social care sector and sponsorship of the Scottish Children's Reporters Administration and Scottish Social Services Council. It also supports the operation of four Learning Networks across Scotland, working with employers and practitioners to support ongoing learning and development and Centres for Excellence providing training and support for the workforce on specialist areas such as dealing with drug and alcohol issues. In addition, it supports a broad range of activity to improve children's services, including commitments shared with local government set out in the Concordat, such as:

  • deliver a long-term early years strategy in order that everyone involved in supporting this critical stage of children's lives are signed up to a shared vision;
  • implement the Protection of Vulnerable Groups Act to improve protection for children and vulnerable adults and to reduce the bureaucratic burdens on those working with them;
  • develop and work with Community Planning Partnerships to strengthen strategy and practice around child protection, looked after children (including those in kinship care) and preventing offending by young people, to improve outcomes for the children, young people, families and communities most at risk;
  • funds the programme of work of the Social Work Inspection Agency and the Education Analytical Services (including schools, children and young people and lifelong learning).

Budget Changes

£0.9m has been transferred into the budget from the third sector budget to Disclosure Scotland to support the operation of the Central Registered Body in Scotland.

Student Awards Agency for Scotland ( SAAS)

Spending Plans 2008 to 2011

Table 4.05 More detailed spending plans (Level 3)

2009-10

Budget

£m

2010-11

Draft Budget

£m

SAAS Running Costs

6.4

6.6

SAAS Capital Charges

1.2

1.3

Fees, Grants and Bursaries

279.5

332.5

Student Loans Company Administration

5.5

5.6

Unwinding of Discount on Debt Sale Subsidy Provision

4.0

4.0

Cost of Student Loans

71.4

71.4

Unwinding of Discount on Write-off Provision

12.0

12.0

Student Loans Net New Lending ( AME)

132.7

135.0

Total

512.7568.4

Student Loans Interest Subsidy to Banks (outside TME)

4.5

4.5

What the budget does

The Student Award Agency for Scotland budget meets the cost of the Agency's functions which are to provide financial support and advice to Scottish domiciled students undertaking higher education courses in the UK and abroad and to EU students studying in Scotland. The level of spend is demand led, depending on the student population in a given year, but an overall control is maintained on the number of students for which the Scottish Further and Higher Education Funding Council funds institutions.

The Agency administers schemes covering undergraduate and postgraduate students as well as bursaries for nursing and midwifery students. It administers the Individual Learning Accounts Scotland scheme in partnership with Skills Development Scotland.

The budget for the Student Awards Agency for Scotland includes the resources we allocated at the Spending Review in 2007 to further improve the support students receive. We will announce our response to the consultation which sought stakeholders' views on how to spend these additional resources, Supporting a Smarter Scotland, before the end of the year."

Budget Changes

The SAAS budget includes £40.3m relating to tuition fees from a technical transfer between SFHEFC and SAAS (and described in the commentary on Level 2). It also includes an increase of £10.3m in the AME Loans net new lending figure.

Scottish Further and Higher Education Funding Council ( SFHEFC)

Table 4.06 More detailed spending plans (Level 3)

2009-10

Budget

£m

2010-11

Draft

Budget

£m

Current Funding for Further Education Colleges

565.5

584.2

Capital Grants for Further Education Colleges

82.9

109.0

Current Funding for Higher Education Institutions

991.1

991.7 2

Capital Grants for Higher Education Institutions

101.7

83.2

SFHEFC Administration

8.9

9.1

Total

1,750.11,777.2

2 A figure of £1,032m (reflecting the £40.3m transfer to SAAS) should be used for the purposes of a year-on-year comparison with the corresponding figure for 2009-10. The £40.3 million reflects the fourth year of a technical adjustment between SFHEFC and SAAS. These monies are paid to universities in the form of tuition fees.

What the budget does

The Scottish Further and Higher Education Funding Council budgets fund strategic investment in Scotland's 43 colleges and 20 higher educational institutions (including Open University (Scotland)). Funding supports development and delivery of study programmes that offer coherent high quality provision for learners across Scotland and enables universities to undertake world class research to maintain Scotland's international reputation for educational excellent in teaching and research.

Budget Changes

Reflecting capital funding previously accelerated from 2010-11 across 2008-09 and 2009-10, the higher education capital line will be reduced by £12m and that for further education reduced by £8.5m.

As noted previously, £40.3m will be transferred to SAAS for tuition fees.

The budget has increased as follows: £5m has been transferred from the Other Lifelong Learning budget for the Scottish Institute for Cell Signalling; and £8.4m of consequential funding arising from the 2009 UK Budget has been allocated to the further education resource budget.

Other Lifelong Learning

Table 4.07 More detailed spending plans (Level 3)

2009-10

Budget

£m

2010-11

Draft

Budget

£m

Learning Connections

3.9

5.8

Education Maintenance Allowances

36.5

31.5

International Lifelong Learning Strategy

2.3

2.3

Scottish Qualification Authority, Vocational Qualification and Skills

1.7

1.8

Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework

0.6

0.6

Union Learning

1.4

1.4

Skills for Business Network (formerly Sector Skills Council)

1.0

1.0

HQ and Training Grants (Adult learning)

0.7

0.7

Determined to Succeed 1

2.8

2.4

Young People Who Need More Choices and Chances

6.4

5.0

Activity Agreement and Learning Agreement Pilots

3.0

6.0

Workforce Plus - National Development Work

1.9

1.7

Skills Development Scotland Ltd

204.1

198.2

Science-related Programmes delivered by the Office of the Chief Scientific Adviser

6.8

7.6

English for Speakers of Other Languages

3.0

3.0

Miscellaneous

0.8

0.6

Total

276.9

269.6

1 Lifelong Learning provides Local Authorities with Specific Grants for Determined to Succeed which amount to £19.2m per year.

What the budget does

The other Lifelong Learning budgets support policy and development relating to all aspects of lifelong learning, including:

  • strengthening education and skills through ScotAction, an integrated package combining new and revitalised measures to help individuals and businesses through the recession and provide skills assistance for training for work, training in work and training from work to work to help people and businesses in Scotland survive the downturn and thrive when the economy starts to recover.
  • offering a place in post-16 education, training, or non-formal learning through 16+ Learning Choices, to all young people who want it. We are determined to avoid another lost generation of young people and this means we need to offer young people a better range of options which fit with their needs and interests - whether in school, college, workbased training or in a community or third sector setting. We must also ensure those young people have access to the support they need. Our recent changes to the Education Maintenance Allowance programme target support at those young people who need it most, and our pilots of Activity Agreements will extend financial support and intensive advice and guidance to some of our most vulnerable young people.
  • improving levels of adult literacy and numeracy which is crucial to securing a competitive economy; promoting education and lifelong learning; and tackling health and well-being.
  • working with businesses to champion the best use of skills in the workplace, which is vital for businesses positioning themselves for recovery.
  • capitalising on our excellent university research; and increasing interaction between universities, in order to build up business innovation and productivity

Budget changes

We are transferring £3m from EMAs to support Activity and Learning Agreement pilots.

The Skills Development Scotland ( SDS) budget 2010-11 has been increased by £16m for Modern Apprenticeships, taking into account the agreement reached with Parliament on the 2009-10 Scottish Budget.

The SDS budget includes planned efficiency savings for the organisation to be met through the delivery of its voluntary severance scheme for non-frontline staff and other planned administrative efficiencies. These will not impact on the provision of training opportunities or on the availability of frontline staff to support clients.

£5m has been transferred to SFHEFC for the Scottish Institute for Cell Signalling.

Central Government Grants to Local Authorities

Table 4.08 More detailed spending plans (Level 3)

2009-10

Budget

£m

2010-11

Draft Budget

£m

Determined to Succeed

19.2

19.2

Total

19.2

19.2

What the budget does

Under the Concordat, most of the previous budget for ring-fenced grant was added to the budget for general support to local authorities. This table shows the remaining area where there are ring-fenced grants to local authorities (or similar bodies) for Determined to Succeed.